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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- The Southwest is getting walloped with winter conditions this weekend.

A disturbance is moving through the region Saturday morning, bringing snow to parts of Nevada and Utah, including Salt Lake City. This disturbance will move further east Saturday, expanding snow into the Colorado and Wyoming Rockies. Significant impacts are expected through much of Saturday on I-15, I-70 and I-80 in Utah.

This disturbance will develop into a more significant and organized storm with impacts arriving in the Colorado and Wyoming later on Saturday and lasting into Sunday. The storm will then bring significant snow to parts of the Plains and upper Midwest on Sunday and Monday. Winter storm watches, warnings and advisories have been posted for parts of the Rockies, central Plains and upper Midwest.

Impacts from the storm will arrive in Denver and the high Plains early Sunday morning. Denver will see locally 4 to 8 inches of snow. Some locations outside of the city could see locally 1 foot of snow. Winds will be a concern as well, with gusts up to 40 mph likely. This storm arrives in Denver after the region saw temperatures in the 60s and 70s on Friday.

On Sunday afternoon and evening, the storm will track toward the Central Plains and upper Midwest, including Sioux City and Sioux Falls. Heavy snow will hamper any Sunday afternoon and evening travel in the region. The heavy snow will last through the early hours of Monday in this region. On the warmer side of the storm, in the southern Plains, strong thunderstorms are expected to develop on Sunday evening and early Monday. Isolated severe storms will be likely with locally damaging winds and large hail. The risk for these strong storms include parts of Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee and Mississippi.

As the low-pressure system tracks toward Minnesota and Wisconsin late Sunday and Monday, bands of heavier snow will dump locally 6 to 12 inches across parts of eastern Minnesota and Northwest Wisconsin.

Meanwhile, another disturbance is heading for the Pacific Northwest on Saturday night. Heavy rain, strong winds and mountain snow will all be likely. Winds will peak during Sunday morning across parts of Washington and Oregon with gusts locally to 45 mph. Landslides will be possible.

Above-average temperatures are forecasted for much of the eastern U.S. Temperatures in much of this region are forecasted to be 10 to 20 degrees above average.

With temperatures forecasted to be near 50 on Saturday in New York, it will be nearly 25 degrees warmer on Saturday in New York than it was this past Sunday. Chicago is expected to be near the low 50s. Washington will be in the mid-50s. This is pretty comfortable weather for the middle of winter.

Like last weekend, with the milder temperatures, the threat for localized ice jams and thin ice remain a concern across parts of the Northeast.

For those who enjoy this milder winter weather, there is good news: The chances for above-average temperatures will remain likely through the next several weeks for much of the eastern U.S.

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f11photo/iStock/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) -- The analysis of a computer belonging to Las Vegas mass shooter Stephen Paddock revealed a "disturbing search history" and numerous images of child pornography, investigators said today.

In the months, weeks and days leading up to the Oct. 1, 2017, shooting, Paddock searched online for open-air concert venues, Las Vegas SWAT tactics, weapons, explosives and the expected attendance for the Route 91 Harvest Festival on the Las Vegas Strip, according to a preliminary investigative report released by police today.

Paddock ultimately opened fire at the country music festival and killed 58 people.

Several hundred images of child pornography were also found on the hard drive of Paddock's laptop, according to the report.

"This report is not going to answer every question or answer the biggest question, which is why he did what he did," Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo said at a news conference today before the report's release.

Paddock opened fire on the music festival crowd from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. A total of 851 people suffered injuries directly related to the shooting and its aftermath, and 422 of them specifically suffered from some kind of gunfire injury, Lombardo said.

Authorities found Paddock, 64, dead inside his hotel suite. The Clark County coroner's office later ruled Paddock's manner of death a suicide, saying the cause was an intraoral gunshot wound to the head.

Investigators believe Paddock decided to take his own life when he realized authorities were within close proximity to him, Lombardo said.

Although a motive remains unknown, the report says investigators have determined that Paddock acted alone and was self-funded through his gambling and past real estate transactions. There was no evidence of radicalization or ideology, the report says.

"There was only one person responsible and that was Stephen Paddock," Lombardo said at today’s news conference.

No suicide note or manifesto was found stating Paddock's intentions, according to the report. The only handwritten document found in either of Paddock's connecting hotel rooms was a small note indicating measurements and distances related to the use of rifles.

Investigators don't anticipate charges to be brought against Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley, Lombardo said.

She lived in a retirement community with Paddock at his home in Mesquite, Nevada, but was visiting family in the Philippines at the time of the shooting.

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Creatas/iStock/Thinkstock(RIVERSIDE, Calif.) -- The California siblings allegedly held captive and tortured by their parents have a bond "with each other that's very natural for people who are cut off from the outside world," one doctor treating them told ABC News.

That bond helps them recover both physically and emotionally, continued Dr. Fari Kamalpour, who works at the Corona Regional Medical Center, where the adult victims are being treated.

A limited staff is now working with those victims trying to develop their own bond with the siblings, Corona Regional Medical Center CEO Mark Uffer added.

"We've limited the type of physicians that go in to see them," Uffer told ABC News. "We've used people that we knew that they could develop a bond with and trust."

Uffer said patients notice if their doctors appear "hopeless," "so we picked the most positive, upbeat, caring, consistent individuals to care for them and I'm sure that they can feel that."

David and Louise Turpin, accused of abusing their children for years, were arrested after the victims were found Sunday at their home in Perris. The Turpins allegedly forced the children to shower only once a year, shackled them and beat them routinely, Riverside County District Attorney Mike Hestrin said. When found, they hadn't been to a doctor in over four years and had never been to a dentist, he added. The Turpins have pleaded not guilty to the charges against them.

A lawyer for David Turpin told ABC News, "What we would like the public to know is that our clients are presumed to be innocent and that’s a very important presumption." He added, "We’re going to provide a vigorous defense."

The siblings -- ages 2 to 29 -- have since been hospitalized for treatment.

All the victims except for the toddler are severely malnourished, Hestrin said, adding that the eldest victim -- a 29-year-old woman -- weighs only 82 pounds. He said another child, a 12-year-old, is the weight of an average 7-year-old.

Uffer described the victims' conditions as "not so different than a prisoner of war."

Now, the hospital staff is acting as these siblings' "first stage of their introduction to the outside world," Kamalpour told ABC News. "So what they pick up from us as a group of providers in this hospital is going to be the stepping stone for the future, adjustment to life. So we are providing that environment ... in terms of the teaching, training, educating, nourishing emotionally and physically."

Louise and David Turpin were arrested in the torture and child endangerment case in Perris, Calif.

Asked if she ever breaks down after leaving her patients, Kamalpour said, "Absolutely. How can you not? You reflect when you leave."

"The staff that's worked with them have made comments to me," Uffer said. "One of our nurses, she says, 'I'm 24 years old.' And so these adults are right in her age group. And she said, 'I feel so very fortunate with the experiences I've had in life as I see this unfolding before me.'

"So it's affected the staff. I don't think there's any time that any of us have left them where we haven't been somewhat tearful," he said. "It becomes very personal to you. And you it hurts to see what another human being can do to another human being. So it does stay with you. I don't think there's any of us that are involved or have spoken to them or interacted with them that slept much in the last week because you wake up in the middle of the night worrying about them.

"We feel we've done the best for them while they're here and we hope that that will pay off for them moving forward as they go back out into life someday," Uffer said.

The Riverside University Health System Foundation has opened the Perris Sibling Support Fund "to ensure that the healthcare and educational needs of the children and young adults are cared for both now and in the future," said Nicole Orr, senior director of development at the Riverside University Health System Foundation.

"The response was immediate and it has been tremendous," Orr said. "We are receiving hundreds of calls and emails. It is encouraging that events like this bring out the desire in people to help in whatever ways they can."

David Turpin, 57, and Louise Turpin, 49, have each been charged with 12 counts of torture, 12 counts of false imprisonment, seven counts of abuse of a dependent adult and six counts of child abuse. David Turpin was also charged with one count of a lewd act on a child under the age of 14 by force, fear or duress. They have pleaded not guilty.

Hestrin said, "We’re asking the public to reach out if they have any information about the case."

Anyone with information can call the tip line at the Riverside District Attorney's Office at 888-934-KIDS.

Watch the full story on ABC News "20/20" FRIDAY NIGHT at 10 p.m. ET

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SeanPavonePhoto/iStock/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) -- Baltimore police are asking for help identifying five suspects caught on surveillance video beating a cat with a cinderblock and setting it on fire in mid-December.

Animal Control was called to the scene, where the cat was pronounced dead, police said.

A Facebook post on the Baltimore Police Department's page included video of the incident, as well as images of the suspects.

A local resident who saw the incident unfold and called police told ABC affiliate WMAR that the suspects are teens who have been causing trouble for quite some time.

"Damaging people’s property hanging outside the 7/11 and stores like that -- I don’t know where the parents are and I think they’re partly responsible for these cats being killed like this," the resident, who asked not to be identified, said.

“I don’t think it’s kids being kids," the resident continued. "I think it’s the parents not looking at these group of kids that’s hanging together. To me, it’s like a babysitter that they’re letting these kids go out in groups and they figure they’re alright and they don’t know what they are doing.”

Although the resident said she has never seen the teens acting aggressively against other people, she wonders if this behavior could lead to something far worse.

“When they start killing animals, next they start killing people," the resident told WMAR.

"Anyone with information on the identity of the suspects is asked to call detectives at 443-681-0101 or Metro Crime Stoppers at 1-866-7Lockup," police said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(PHOENIX) -- The man accused of committing nine murders in just three weeks in Arizona is an "aspiring music star" who has spent nearly half of his young life in prison, according to police.

Cleophus Cooksey Jr., 35, has been in custody since the last of the nine alleged killings on Dec. 17, when police say he shot and killed his mother and stepfather.

The nine homicides spanned from Nov. 27 to Dec. 17 in Phoenix and nearby Avondale and Glendale, police said. Four of the nine murders happened within 2 square miles, police said.

Cooksey had been in prison for about 16 years after being involved in an armed robbery, police said. After his release from prison, he was in and out of jail, police said.

Police described him as an "aspiring music star," and some of his YouTube videos -- posted between November 2015 and January 2016 -- had haunting lyrics, like, "That’s the mentality of a killa," and, "I chopped all the best of 'em / murdered all the rest of 'em / nothing left of 'em."

Phoenix Police Sgt. Jonathan Howard called the crimes "disturbing" and told ABC News only three of the nine victims were not known to Cooksey.

Cooksey is accused of stealing a gun from one of the victims and using that weapon in the following six killings, Howard said.

Police believe there is a "distinct possibility" of more victims and Howard said they are being flooded with calls from people helping them find possible connections.

Here is the timeline of crimes, according to police:

Nov. 27:

Two men -- Andrew Remillard and Parker Smith -- were found dead in a car in a parking lot. They were each shot once in the head, according to court documents.

Dec. 2:


A man identified as Salim Richards was in a "physical struggle with the suspect during the shooting" that left him dead, according to court documents. A gun and a necklace were taken from the victim, and on Dec. 3 Cooksey posted a Facebook video showing him wearing a similar necklace, according to court documents. Cooksey was also wearing a similar necklace when he was arrested weeks later, according to court documents.

Cooksey stole the gun from Richards, a security guard, and used it in the following six murders, according to Howard.

Dec. 11:

Cooksey allegedly killed his girlfriend's brother hours after the girlfriend apparently broke up with him, according to court documents.

On Dec. 11 between 8 a.m. and 11 a.m., Cooksey went into an apartment and used a stolen gun to fatally shoot Jesus Real two times in the face at close range while Real was lying down, apparently sleeping, according to court documents.

Real's sister was dating Cooksey, and Cooksey stayed over at this Avondale apartment where the family lived several nights a week, according to court documents. Real's sister told police Cooksey was her ex and they broke up the night before, and he left the house around 7 a.m. on Dec. 11, court documents say.

Dec. 13:

On Dec. 13, a man named Latorrie Beckford was found shot dead on the ground next to an apartment complex parking lot with two gunshot wounds to his head.

 Witnesses told police they heard two gunshots and "when they approached they observed a dark-skinned black male” walking from “close proximity to where the victim was lying," court documents state.

"Witnesses reported the black male pulled out a black semi-auto handgun after being seen by them," the court documents say.

Witnesses said earlier in the day, Beckford was in an altercation with two other men, court documents state. A photo of Cooksey was later shown to one of the witnesses who said the photo was very close to the man she saw in an altercation with Beckford. That assault reportedly took place about three hours before the shooting, the court documents states.

Witnesses said Cooksey was known as "Playboy" at the apartment complex, and in an interview in January, Cooksey admitted to investigators "he goes by the nickname 'Playboy' because of how good he is with women," court documents say.

Dec. 15:

A man named Kristopher Cameron was shot in the neck and abdomen at an apartment complex, court documents say.

 When officers arrived at the west entry gate, a man told police "my cousin has been shot" and he directed officers to where the shooting victim was, according to court documents.

Witnesses said "a black male was observed removing the victim's backpack from him then leaving on foot," court documents say.

After Cooksey was identified as the suspect, that first responding officer "was interviewed and shown a photo of the person he spoke with at the west entry gate. That confirmed Cooksey was the person he spoke with who told him 'my cousin has been shot,'" court documents state.

Cameron was hospitalized and later died. Authorities said Cameron had met Cooksey for a drug deal.

Dec. 15:

Also on Dec. 15, Cooksey was seen on surveillance cameras going into an apartment complex, court documents say. Victim Maria Villanueva was seen parking her car that apartment complex, where she was headed to visit her boyfriend, documents state. The suspect is seen going to her car and watching her, and after several minutes, interacting with her, documents state; at one point, they drive away together. Authorities said she was sexually assaulted. She was found shot to death in an alley, naked from the waist down, documents say.

Cooksey later told police "he did not know how she was killed which he also said about all of the other victims related to these crimes," the documents say.

Dec. 17:

Cooksey's mother and stepfather, Rene Cooksey and Edward Nunn, were shot dead at a home. When police responded, Cleophus Cooksey opened the door and said nothing was going on and no one else was home, according to court documents.

Cleophus Cooksey came outside with blood on him, and when an officer tried to detain him, "he yelled out to the officer he controlled the gun, would slit the officer's throat, he was the strongest man alive, and he took care of the snitches for Donald Trump," according to the court documents.

Cleophus Cooksey was arrested that night and has been jailed since.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A year after millions of women donned pink "pussy hats" in the largest single-day demonstration in American history, women and their allies will again fill the streets this weekend in dozens of cities across the country to protest President Donald Trump's agenda and show the political power they plan to bring to the voting booths.

The main event for the 2018 Women's March, entitled "Power to the Polls," will take place Sunday in Las Vegas, where organizers will launch a national voter registration and mobilization initiative. Hundreds of other anniversary marches and events will be held elsewhere in the nation -- and around the world -- on Saturday and Sunday.

"Women's March has created a powerful movement that has ignited thousands of activists and new leaders," Tamika Mallory, co-president of Women’s March, said in a statement ahead of Sunday. "In 2018, we must turn our work into action ahead of the midterms. This new initiative will address voter registration and voter suppression head on. We marched for justice in D.C., we created our plan in Detroit and now we’re bringing the power of the polls to Nevada."

Organizers chose Nevada to host the main event this year because it "was rocked by the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, recent sexual assault allegations against elected officials and has become a battleground state that will shape the Senate in 2018," according to the Women's March website.

Nevada's vote margins in the presidential race in 2016 were razor thin, with Democrat Hillary Clinton besting Trump in the state by only about 27,000 votes. Republican Sen. Dean Heller is up for reelection this year, and Democrats see it as an opportunity to flip the seat to their side.

Among the honorary co-chairs of the Women's March multistate voter registration and mobilization drive are Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), a harsh critic of Trump who spoke at last year's main event in Washington, D.C., as well as Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), a prominent civil rights leader. The goal of the initiative, which will target key swing states, is to register 1 million votes.

"History will remember the day that Donald Trump was sworn in as President," Warren said in a statement this week. "But history will also remember the day after – the day that women all across the country became an army. We demonstrated that we can be the loud, determined, unrelenting force that reminds all of America about our values — and our willingness to fight for those values. Power to the Polls is about fighting back, and I'm honored to be a part of this campaign."

The anniversary marches in Washington, D.C., and New York City are expected to be among the largest. The march in D.C. starts at the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool at 11 a.m. Eastern Time on Saturday, according to the Facebook event page. In Manhattan, a pre-march rally will be at Central Park West and 61st/62nd Streets at 11:30 a.m. Eastern Time, with the march starting at 12:30 p.m. from Central Park West and 72nd Street, according to the Facebook event page.

There are also anniversary marches and events planned in dozens of cities abroad, including Buenos Aires, Kampala, London, Bangkok, Beijing and Sydney.

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ABC News(PERRIS, Calif.) -- The California siblings allegedly held captive and tortured by their parents kept journals that likely hold "powerful evidence" in the case, the district attorney said in an interview with ABC News. He also opened up about the "courage" of the teenage girl who made a daring escape from the home.

David and Louise Turpin, accused of starving and shackling their 13 children, were arrested on charges of torture and child endangerment after the victims were found Sunday at their home in Perris.

The Turpins allegedly forced them to shower only once a year, never took them to a dentist, and strangled and beat them routinely, Riverside County District Attorney Mike Hestrin said Thursday. The Turpins have pleaded not guilty to the charges against them.

A lawyer for David Turpin told ABC News, "What we would like the public to know is that our clients are presumed to be innocent and that’s a very important presumption." He added, "We’re going to provide a vigorous defense."

'Deplorable' living conditions

Hestrin described the conditions in the home as "absolutely deplorable."

"When they weren't chained for punishment they were confirmed to small rooms ... that became like cells," he told ABC News. "It smelled. It's filthy. It's clear that some of the victims [who were] chained, they were not taken to the bathroom to relieve themselves."  

They were also not allowed to shower more than once a year and if the children washed their hands above the wrist, they were accused of playing in the water and were chained up, Hestrin said.

"These kids were supposed to be being homeschooled, but as far as we can tell they didn’t have much education," he added. "Their reading and writing abilities are very rudimentary, it appears. ... Some of the older victims did attend school public school in Texas up to the third grade, potentially."

The children were not allowed to have toys, although many toys were found in the house in their original packaging, never opened, Hestrin said.

The parents would buy food like pie and leave it out for the children to see but not eat, he said. The family would also sleep all day and stay up all night.

'Powerful evidence' in the siblings' journals

While kept captive in their home, the only thing the children were allowed to do was write in journals, Hestrin said. The hundreds of journals have been recovered and authorities are pouring through them, he said.

Hestrin told ABC News he thinks the journals were likely able to document what was happening in the home in real-time.

"My guess is that’s going to be powerful evidence about what was happening from the perspective of the victims," he said, adding, "We have a lot of evidence to go through. We’ve got the journals to go through, more interviews to do."

A courageous escape


The siblings -- ages 2 to 29 -- were rescued after a 17-year-old girl escaped and alerted authorities to what was happening. Another sibling was going to escape with the 17-year-old but turned back because she was frightened, prosecutors said.

"It took great courage for her to do that after all those years, and that's all she knows," Hestrin said of the escape. "She obviously has the personality that she's going to risk herself for others and she did that and she managed to get out. And we're very glad that she did. I don't know how long this would have continued and I don't know what the end result would have been."

Hestrin called the teen the "bright spot" in the tragic story.

"To think she mustered the courage under those circumstances," he said, "maybe it is a testament to the human will and the will to survive."

Severe malnourishment

The victims have since been hospitalized for treatment. Doctors told ABC News the siblings were starved for years.

All the victims except for the toddler are severely malnourished, Hestrin said at a press conference Thursday, adding that the eldest victim -- a 29-year-old woman -- weighs only 82 pounds. He said another child, a 12-year-old, is the weight of an average 7-year-old.

Motive not clear

"It feels like a bottomless pit," Hestrin said of the case. "We don’t know where the bottom is."

"You’ve got parents that are torturing their children causing them pain causing them suffering over a prolonged period of time through malnourishment, through physical abuse, through psychological abuse. ... It's horrific," he said. "It's hard to believe that it happens in today’s society, but it does."

He said the motive is not clear.

"We’ll learn more as we peel back the onion here, as we look into those journals, as we go through painstakingly all the evidence, all the physical artifacts that are in that house," Hestrin said.

"Nothing that we're going to do is going to completely undo what's been done to them," he said. "All we can do going forward is make sure that we do the best by them to make sure that there taken care of. "

David Turpin, 57, and Louise Turpin, 49, have each been charged with 12 counts of torture, 12 counts of false imprisonment, seven counts of abuse of a dependent adult and six counts of child abuse. David Turpin was also charged with one count of a lewd act on a child under the age of 14 by force, fear or duress. They have pleaded not guilty.

If convicted, they each face a potential sentence of about 94 years to life in prison.

"We’re asking the public to reach out if they have any information about the case," Hestrin said.

Anyone with information can call the tip line at the Riverside District Attorney's Office at 888-934-KIDS.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  With a stroller and a Facebook post, a New York City mom was able to collect 20,000 diapers to donate to families in need.

Audrey Symes, a consultant and mom to a then 2-year-old, was looking for a way to volunteer in her free time. So she called the Good Plus Foundation and asked them if she could help out, perhaps by updating spreadsheets.

But what they really needed, Symes told ABC News, was diapers.

"I had never heard of this need," Symes said. "My daughter was till in diapers. I couldn't stop thinking about it."

So she posted to a popular Facebook group called UES Mommas, which has about 30,000 members. "I was hoping to get 500 diapers with that post," she said. "I got about 1,200."

Symes collected the diapers by walking around the neighborhood and picking them up from moms or in building package rooms. She was inspired.

"There are so many reasons why you might have leftover diapers," she said. "The child moves to a different size or you decide to potty train. If I had one message I want to get out it's that you can donate open packages of diapers."

For people who want to donate but don't live close enough to get their diapers to Symes, the National Diaper Bank Network can help.

"By focusing on diaper need, the National Diaper Bank Network (NDBN) works to meet the basic needs of all children and families living in the United States," Joanne Goldblum, CEO of NDBN told ABC News. "Our mission is to raise awareness of diaper need, strengthen community-based diaper banks, and generate donations of dollars and diapers, so that all babies remain clean, dry and healthy."

The issue of not having diapers, she said, extends well beyond the obvious.

"Most child care centers require parents to provide the diapers their children use, many parents do not use child care when they do not have clean diapers so they either miss work or school, or use less optimum child care for the day," Goldblum said.

In a survey taken by the organization of families in diaper need taken this past summer, 57 percent said that they missed work or school because of a lack of diapers that month.

Goldblum shared with ABC News the story of how a lack of diapers was truly affecting one family's quality of life.

"They didn’t have a lot, but they worked hard to make ends meet. So when the husband, who served in the Army reserves, got deployed overseas, their plans and financial stability were interrupted. He made significantly less [money] during this time. The wife quit school and got a part time job, but the cost of daycare for their 8-month-old and transportation still made it difficult to pay their bills.

"Sometimes, she had to call out of work because she had to choose between buying gas or diapers. She learned about her local diaper bank from another military spouse and began getting help with diapers and baby essentials. Getting help with the diapers and wipes had a tremendous impact on this family’s ability to provide the basic necessities and work towards a better future and she didn’t have to choose between buying diapers or gas."

The organization collects more than 250,000 diapers a month.

There are hundreds of diaper banks around the nation, and people can find their local diaper bank on the organization's website. They also can donate directly to NDBN on that website.

Since that first Facebook post in June of 2016, Symes has continued collecting in her neighborhood, to the tune of 20,000 diapers so far. She collects the majority of them as she did in that very first round: walking her stroller from building to building.

"It's my passion," she said. "I want to prevent a child from a rash or enable a mom to work."

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iStock/Thinkstock(HOUSTON) --  Police in suburban Houston are looking for two bandits who got away with more than $2 million worth of jewelry. The brazen smash-and-grab robbery on Jan. 10 was all captured on the store’s surveillance video.

In the video from Hutton's Jewelry & Gifts, a man is seen asking a clerk about an engagement ring in a glass display case, according to Houston ABC station KTRK. The man next to him pulls out a hammer and quickly shatters the glass while the employee tries to avoid glass fragments.

The first man grabs jewelry from the case as the other starts heading toward the door. Before leaving, he smashes a second display case with the hammer. His accomplice is seen taking items from that one too before fleeing.

According to police, the first suspect wore a black jacket with a red and black Chicago Bulls baseball cap and faded blue jeans. He is in his early 30s, about 200 pounds and stands about 5-foot-10.

The suspect with the hammer appears to be wearing a white floppy bucket hat, black jacket and faded blue jeans. He weighs around 220 pounds and is 6-foot tall, police said.

In December, Houston police say that two men broke into Deutsch & Deutsch Jewelers before it opened for the day. Those robbers rappelled from a hole in the roof into the store. They got away by leaping from that store’s roof to another building in the River Oaks neighborhood. It was unknown if the robberies were related.

“We have not connected our suspects to any other cases, but it’s a safe bet they’ve done this before,” Doug Adolph, Sugar Land City spokesperson, told ABC News.

The Sugar Land Police Department has asked anyone with a tip reach out to (281) 275-2540 or the Fort Bend County Crime Stoppers at (281) 342-TIPS.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEWARK, N.J.) -- A television film crew was arrested on Thursday after attempting to pass a suspicious item with "all of the makings of an improvised explosive device" through security at Newark Liberty International Airport.

“At least seven individuals have been arrested by Port Authority Police after Transportation Security Administration (TSA) officers detected a suspicious item in a carry-on bag,” said TSA in a statement.

A preliminary investigation revealed some members of the group intentionally carried the item through the security checkpoint while others in the group covertly filmed the encounter. Their goal was to see whether or not the TSA would detect the item, which was concealed in a rolling bag.

TSA officers did in fact detect it, and the film crew was arrested on multiple charges.

The Star-Ledger reported that the crew was filming for cable network CNBC.

The perpetrators face possible civil penalties by TSA, and can be charged over $13,000 per security violation.

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Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A new report states that right-wing extremists were responsible for the majority of extremist murders in the U.S. in 2017.

Jewish group the Anti-Defamation League compiled the report, noting how the murders committed by white supremacists included some linked to the "alt-right" -- shorthand for the "alternative right" -- which it states “expanded its operations in 2017 from the internet into the physical world.”

The report includes white supremacists and individuals who identify with the alt-right movement as part of its "right-wing" classification.

“Energized by the 2016 election and the media attention given to the movement, alt-right adherents … increasingly involved themselves in the real world as well as the virtual realm,” the report states.

Of the 34 murders in 2017 that the ADL examined in the report, 20 were committed by people who have ties to far-right extremism, including white supremacists.

There were a number of other high-profile fatal incidents, but the parameters of the report mean that some of the most deadly incidents from 2017 were not included.

For instance, the Las Vegas country music festival shooting and the church shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, were not included in the report because there was not confirmed evidence of a connection to any specific extremist group or ideology in either of those incidents. The report notes that extremist-related killings only make up “a small fraction” of the number of homicides in the U.S. in a given year.

John Cohen, a former counterterrorism coordinator for the Department of Homeland Security and current ABC News consultant, said that the report is valuable but needs to be put in context.

"In one respect, the ADL report confirms what law enforcement leaders have known for months -- that when it comes to ideologically motivated violence, the primary threat comes not from immigrants but from individuals who reside legally or were born here in the United States," Cohen said. "On another respect, the report understates the threat facing the U.S. in that it doesn't include non-ideologically motivated mass casualty attacks such as those that occurred in Las Vegas and Sutherland Springs."

Among the high-profile homicides that were included are two vehicular-based attacks: the attack by a white supremacist in Charlottesville, Virginia, at the “Unite the Right” protest that left counter-protester Heather Heyer dead, and the truck-ramming incident on a bike path in New York City that left eight people dead. Sayfullo Saipov, an Uzbek national who police said was inspired by ISIS, has been charged in the New York case. The bike path attack was the single deadliest extremist incident in 2017, the report states. The report also notes that 2017 was the second year in a row with deadly attacks by black nationalists.

In spite of the deadliest death toll stemming from an incident involving an Islamic extremist, it still marks a significantly smaller portion of the extremist death count from the previous year, since 2016 included the Pulse nightclub attack, which killed 49 people and was carried out by a self-professed ISIS supporter.

By contrast, the 20 far-right extremist homicides mark a dramatic uptick from the year prior, with 59 percent of this year’s total being attributed to that category as opposed to only 20 percent in 2016. This doesn’t surprise experts at the ADL, however.

“Increased real-world activity by the alt-right could result in more alliances or crossover between the alt-right supporters and other elements of the white supremacist movement,” said Oren Segal, the director of the ADL’s Center on Extremism. “Violence is very widely accepted, ideologically and culturally, within the white supremacist movement and therefore any increase in real-world activity by the alt-right could also result in more real-world violence by its adherents.”

Heidi Beirich, the director of the Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), said that the ADL report is "reinforcing a broad trend: that right-wing extremism remains very deadly."

She cited a 2015 SPLC report which stated that a right-wing terrorist attack had either been attempted or succeeded every 34 days between 2010 and 2015.

Right-wing extremism is "an important issue, one that has been largely ignored ... and shouldn't be because it's deadly just like all forms of terrorism," Beirich said.

"White supremacy is indigenous [in the U.S.] It's been here since the founding of our country," she said, contrasting it to foreign extremism like the attackers responsible for the Sept. 11 attacks.

"If you don't keep your eye on that ball, that's the one that's not going anywhere unfortunately," Beirich said.

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ABC/Randy Sager(NEWARK, N.J.) -- Chris Christie has only been the ex-governor of New Jersey for two days but he has already felt the loss of at least one perk of the job.

Christie was rebuffed while attempting to pass through a gate access point at Newark Liberty International Airport he used as governor, according to a person with knowledge of the incident.

It would have allowed Christie to enter the secure side of the airport without going through screening.

A state trooper was escorting Christie at the time. While the New Jersey State Police declined to comment about this specific incident, the agency did say an outgoing governor is afforded a security escort for up to six months following completion of his term.

Port Authority Police and a TSA officer eventually redirected Christie to the regular checkpoint, and the former governor went through the usual security screening.

At all times Christie was cordial, the person familiar with the incident said, and did not object to going through regular screening just like the other passengers.

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aijohn784/iStock/Thinkstock(HARRISBURG, Pa.) -- A 45-year-old U.S. Marshal was shot and killed Thursday morning as he and other officers were ambushed by gunfire while trying to serve a warrant to a woman in Pennsylvania's capital.

Deputy U.S. Marshal Christopher David Hill, a married father of two and an Army veteran who served in Afghanistan, was part of a fugitive task force that was fired upon while executing a warrant for the arrest of Shayla Lynette Towles Pierce, wanted by Harrisburg police on suspicion of illegal possession of a firearm, simple assault and making terrorist threat offenses, according to the U.S. Marshals Service.

After entering the residence on the 1800 block of Mulberry Street, task force officers placed Pierce in handcuffs and noticed several children on the second floor, said David Freed, the U.S. Attorney for the Middle District of Pennsylvania.

"At that point, the officers heard gunfire that appeared to emanate from the second floor of the residence," Freed said.

A man, later identified by the U.S. Department of Justice as Kevin Sturgis, 31, of Philadelphia, had opened fire on the officers.

Hill and officer Kyle Pitts, a 10-year veteran of the York City Police Department, were struck by bullets, Freed said. Other task force members quickly removed the wounded officers out the back of the house and set up a perimeter.

"Preliminary indications from the investigation indicate that a male individual then exited the front of residence firing at law enforcement officers," Freed said. "Gunfire was returned and that male was killed in front of the residence."

Sturgis was pronounced dead at the scene.

Hill and Pitts were taken to a hospital, where Hill died and Pitts was undergoing surgery for non-life-threatening injuries.

"None of us has sufficient words to express our grief and sorrow," Freed said. "The Hills have lost a father, a son, a brother far too soon. Our community has lost a hero, who was doing nothing more than his duty."

Freed said the investigation was being led by the FBI and that it was too early to say why the gunman opened fire.

Sturgis had two active warrants for his arrest, including one for failure to appear for sentencing for illegal possession of a firearm, the Department of Justice said in a press release. Sturgis also had a juvenile adjudication, the same as a conviction in adult court, for rape.

U.S. Marshal Martin Pane said Hill had been a member of the agency for 11 years and initially assigned to the U.S. Marshals service at the superior court in Washington, D.C., before transferring to the Harrisburg office in 2009.

Hill was highly involved in the 2014 manhunt for Eric Matthew Frein, the domestic terrorist and murderer sentenced to death for an attack on a Pennsylvania State Police barracks that killed a state trooper. Hill led a large group of U.S. Marshals, FBI agents and state troopers in pursuit of Frein through the Pennsylvania woods.

Hill served in Afghanistan from 1993 to 1996. As a U.S. Marshal, Hill returned to help the country set up a judicial system and received the U.S. Marshals service distinguished group award for his "significant contributions in Afghanistan." Hill also was a trained explosives breacher and a firearms and tactical training officer, Pane said.

"Deputy Hill made the ultimate sacrifice," said Pane, holding back tears. "Deputy Hill served the American people and the citizens of this community with courage. He will be missed and words cannot say how much."

Dauphin County District Attorney Fran Chardo said his office is in charge of investigating the officer-involved shooting, in keeping with county protocol.

"Based on the fact that the dead suspect opened fire first, it appears, preliminarily," Chardo said, "that it was a justified used of deadly force."

Pierce was arrested and is being held on $200,000 bail.


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Ruskpp/iStock/Thinkstock(LUMBERTON, N.C.) -- It's been seven months since the bodies of three women were found just weeks apart within a four-block radius in North Carolina, and investigators still don't have answers about what happened to them.

The FBI on Wednesday announced a reward of up to $30,000 for information that helps investigators determine the circumstances that led to the deaths of Christina Bennett, Rhonda Jones and Megan Oxendine in Lumberton, a city located some 95 miles south of the state's capital.

Bennett was found dead inside a house on Peachtree Street on April 18, 2017. Jones' body was found outside a house on East 5th Street on the same day.

Oxendine was found dead outside a house on East 8th Street on June 3, 2017. That month, the Lumberton Police Department requested assistance from the FBI in the three separate death investigations.

A cause of death has not yet been determined for any of the women, according to the FBI.

Authorities on Wednesday urged anyone who came into contact with the women to come forward to help investigators create a timeline of when and where they were last seen alive.

“Every part of our work as law enforcement benefits from help we receive from the public. We need the community’s assistance, the people’s eyes and ears, information from friends and neighbors," John Strong, special agent in charge of the FBI in North Carolina, said in a statement. "So we ask you to pick up the phone and call us. Tell us what you know, what you heard, and what you saw."

Lumberton Police Chief Michael McNeill previously said it was unclear whether there is a connection between the three deaths, which have haunted the community.

“As police chief and as a member of this community, I want to know what happened to Christina, Rhonda and Megan. I also understand there is a lot of uncertainty, concern and even fear right now," McNeill said in a statement Wednesday. "Let me reassure you that we are committed to finding out the answers. We hope the people of Lumberton will help us."

Anyone with information regarding when and where the women were last seen is asked to call the FBI's Charlotte field office at 704-672-6100.

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Alex_Schmidt/iStock/Thinkstock(PHOENIX) -- A homicide suspect in Arizona is accused of committing nine murders in just three weeks, Phoenix police said Thursday.

Cleophus Cooksey Jr., 35, has been in custody since the last of the nine alleged killings on Dec. 17 when police say he shot and killed his mother and stepfather.

But after he was arrested, police kept "digging," Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams said, and discovered seven other fatal shootings in the area they say are connected to Cooksey.

The nine homicides spanned from Nov. 27 to Dec. 17 in Phoenix and nearby Avondale and Glendale, police said.

Phoenix Police Sgt. Jon Howard said police believe there may be more victims and said they were flooded with tips called in from the public.

Here is the timeline of crimes, according to police:

Nov. 27:

Two men -- Andrew Remillard and Parker Smith -- were found dead in a car in a parking lot. They were each shot once in the head, according to court documents. A motive has not been determined.

Dec. 2:

A man identified as Salim Richards was in a "physical struggle with the suspect during the shooting" that left him dead, according to court documents. A gun and a necklace were taken from the victim, and on Dec. 3 Cooksey posted a Facebook video showing him wearing a similar necklace, according to court documents. Cooksey was also wearing a similar necklace when he was arrested weeks later, according to court documents.

Cooksey stole the gun from Richards, a security guard, and used it in the following six murders, according to Howard.

Dec. 11:

Cooksey allegedly killed his girlfriend's brother hours after the girlfriend apparently broke up with him, according to court documents.

On Dec. 11 between 8 a.m. and 11 a.m., Cooksey went into an Avondale apartment and used a stolen gun to fatally shoot a man named Jesus Real two times in the face at close range while Real was laying on his side, apparently sleeping, according to court documents. The gun used was stolen from a previous murder victim, court documents say.

Real's sister was dating Cooksey, and Cooksey stayed over at this Avondale apartment where the family lived several nights a week, according to court documents. Real's sister told police Cooksey was her ex and they broke up the night before, and he left the house around 7 a.m. on Dec. 11, court documents say.

Dec. 13:

On Dec. 13, a man named Latorrie Beckford was found shot dead on the ground next to an apartment complex parking lot with two gunshot wounds to his head.

Witnesses told police they heard two gunshots and "when they approached they observed a dark-skinned black male” walking from “close proximity to where the victim was lying," court documents state.

"Witnesses reported the black male pulled out a black semi-auto handgun after being seen by them," the court documents say.

Witnesses said earlier in the day, Beckford was in an altercation with two other men, court documents state. A photo of Cooksey was later shown to one of the witnesses who said the photo was very close to the man she saw in an altercation with Beckford. That assault reportedly took place about three hours before the shooting, the court documents states.

Witnesses said Cooksey was known as "Playboy" at the apartment complex, and in an interview in January, Cooksey admitted to investigators "he goes by the nickname 'Playboy' because of how good he is with women," court documents say.

Dec. 15:

A man named Kristopher Cameron was shot in the neck and abdomen at an apartment complex, court documents say.

When officers arrived at the west entry gate, a man told police "my cousin has been shot" and he directed officers to where the shooting victim was, according to court documents.

Witnesses said "a black male was observed removing the victim's backpack from him then leaving on foot," court documents say.

After Cooksey was identified as the suspect, that first responding officer "was interviewed and shown a photo of the person he spoke with at the west entry gate. That confirmed Cooksey was the person he spoke with who told him 'my cousin has been shot,'" court documents state.

Cameron was hospitalized and later died. Authorities said Cameron had met Cooksey for a drug deal.

Dec. 15:

Also on Dec. 15, Cooksey was seen on surveillance cameras going into an apartment complex, court documents say. Victim Maria Villanueva was seen parking her car that apartment complex, where she was headed to visit her boyfriend, documents state. The suspect is seen going to her car and watching her, and after several minutes, interacting with her, documents state; at one point, they drive away together. Authorities said she was sexually assaulted. She was found shot to death in an alley, naked from the waist down, documents say.

Cooksey later told police "he did not know how she was killed which he also said about all of the other victims related to these crimes," the documents say.

Cameron and Villanueva were killed with the same gun, according to documents.

Dec. 17:

Cooksey's mother and stepfather, Rene Cooksey and Edward Nunn, were shot dead at a home. When police responded, Cleophus Cooksey opened the door and said nothing was going on and no one else was home, according to court documents.

Cleophus Cooksey came outside with blood on him, and when an officer tried to detain him, "he yelled out to the officer he controlled the gun, would slit the officer's throat, he was the strongest man alive, and he took care of the snitches for Donald Trump," according to the court documents.

Cleophus Cooksey was arrested that night and has been jailed since.

Suspect is 'off the streets'

Glendale Police Chief Rick St. John said the cases came together thanks to a patrol officer who answered the call and was "doing the right things: Taking a person into custody, recognizing there were abnormalities to his behavior. He was trying to conceal what was going on. The officer very appropriately took the right actions. ... And that all occurred before the agencies really started to collaborate."

He said he is "proud as heck" that the suspect is "off the streets."

When asked if there could be more victims, police said that is a "distinct possibility" and a "concern of our investigators."

Police said Cleophus Cooksey had been in prison for about 16 years after being involved in an armed robbery. After his release from prison, he was in and out of jail, police said.

Officials said Phoenix is one of the few cities chosen by the Department of Justice for the National Crime Gun Intelligence Center Initiative, which allowed the Phoenix police to test shell casings at their headquarters; testing that used to take weeks can now take just hours.

Authorities said they expect people in the community to have information to help piece together the relationships and possible motives. Anyone with information is asked to call authorities.

In an interview in January, Cleophus Cooksey "denied having committed any murders but did admit to being in certain places which matched with" evidence from electronic devices, according to court documents.

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