South Jersey's News Talk Leader!           Radio You Can Depend On!          
COVID-19 News

iStock/brightstars(GEORGIA) -- With Georgia successfully becoming one of the first states to open for business following the COVID-19 lockdowns, Gov. Brian P. Kemp issued a "best practices" guide for film and TV crews working in the Peach State. 

Georgia has become a massive hub for Hollywood productions, with everything from the Marvel movies to MacGyver and The Walking Dead shooting there -- some 391 productions in all in 2019, Deadline reports

Governor Kemp's guide seeks to cut down on possible means of transmission of coronavirus -- or any easily communicable disease -- on sets, which are usually notorious for their close quarters and shared equipment. 

To that end, the guide includes rules that mandate cast and crew members getting temperature checks, wearing masks, utilizing social distancing, and the reduction of background extras in scenes. 

Location scouting and casting should be done using video conference technology as much as possible, the guide stipulates; also, the sharing of costumes, mics, and camera equipment would be discouraged, and plastic barriers would be used between performers during rehearsals.

In addition, cast and crew members are encouraged to take their own transportation to and from set; multi-person vans are usually the norm.

Plus, mealtimes should be staggered, and instead of the usual buffet-style craft services trucks seen on sets, take-out food is recommended.

Overseeing these rules will be a designated Occupational Risk Prevention specialist on set.

In a statement, Kemp noted, in part, "The Georgia Film Office has maintained their close work with industry executives to develop these outlines for how productions can help protect cast and crew members."

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



Apple TV (LOS ANGELES) -- A special episode of the Apple TV workplace comedy series Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet, is now live -- and has so far raised $600,000 for COVID-19-related charities.

The cast donated half of that money, and show co-creator and star Rob McElhenney and his wife, Always Sunny in Philadelphia co-star Kaitlin Olsen, matched the sum.

The remotely shot episode was quite the effort for its stars, McElhenney tells ABC Audio. "There was only one camera angle in every scene. So once...we were all set, we would get 15 takes because it was so easy. ...[B]ut everything leading up to it and then everything after that point was an absolute nightmare."

Mac adds, "So to me, just this figuring out a new way in which we could do something was just as exciting as making the episode itself. It was both really fun and really awful. And I and I would love to do it again."

The episode also gave McElhenney a chance to tweak certain celebs in quarantine, via his at-times egomanical Mythic Quest character, Ian.

"That's born out of me, looking at Twitter and at Instagram ...and seeing rich people complaining about the fact that they had to clean a toilet. And I'm like, 'Guys, you got to shut up...Everybody cleans their own toilet. Oh, boo hoo.' You know, you don't have your maid coming over to make you a PB&J sandwich? OK. Make your own PB&J sandwich, and certainly don't complain about it! So we thought, well, we got to satirize that."  

Mythic Quest: Raven's Banquet also stars F. Murray Abraham, Charlotte Nicdao, Danny Pudi, David Hornsby, Jo Ennis, and Ashly Burch.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



Photo by Noel Vasquez/FilmMagic(NEW ZEALAND) -- Like many movies, Oscar winning filmmaker James Cameron's forthcoming Avatar sequels hit a major snag when the COVID-19 pandemic shuttered production.  But now his longtime producing partner insists work will resume next week. 

In an Instagram post showing off some of the movie's extensive physical sets, Jon Landau stated, "Our Avatar sets are ready...Couldn't be more excited to be headed back to New Zealand next week."

Indeed, the shooting location of the four sequels was key to getting back to work.  The island nation -- which took early, methodical steps to limit COVID-19's spread -- currently has just 1,504 confirmed cases of the disease in its population of under five million people, with only 21 reported deaths.

Avatar 2 is slated for a Dec. 17, 2021 opening, while the third, fourth, and fifth films in the series are scheduled to roll out in 2023, 2025, and 2027, respectively.

The movies are being shot concurrently. The casts include returning stars Sam Worthington, Zoe Saldana, Sigourney Weaver, Stephen Lang, and Giovanni Ribisi; series newcomers include Oscar-winner Kate Winslet, Cliff Curtis, and Dileep Rao.

The movies will be released by 20th Century Studios, which is owned by Disney, parent company of ABC News.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



Melinda Sue Gordon/©2020 Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc. All Rights Reserved. (LOS ANGELES) -- Warner Bros. and Dark Knight trilogy director Christopher Nolan seem to be banking on movie theaters being open following the COVID-19 shutdowns, based on the just-released trailer for his anticipated action film, Tenet

The extended preview for the film promises that, unlike other movies have gone to streaming services to avoid the shuttered cinemas, Nolan's movie is "COMING TO THEATERS."

Following last December's teaser for Tenet -- starring John David Washington, Robert Pattinson, Elizabeth Debicki from Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 and frequent Nolan collaborator Michael Caine -- the new trailer finally reveals what the hush-hush plot is about.

The central conceit apparently has to do with the power to reverse the flow of time.  Just as Nolan's imagination saw skyscrapers splitting open like flower petals and physics-bending fight scenes in InceptionTenet's use of time as a weapon lends itself to some mind-bending visuals, like a gunfight in reverse.

"You're not shooting the bullet, you're catching it," an associate tells Washington's character at a firing range.

Tenet is still officially set for a July 17 release, but it remains to be seen if Nolan and Warner Bros.' wishes will come true.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



(NEW YORK) -- Here's the latest information on the COVID-19 coronavirus as of 9:55 a.m. ET.

Latest reported numbers globally per Johns Hopkins University
Global diagnosed cases: 5,127,125
Global deaths: 333,398.  The United States has the most deaths of any single country, with 94,729.
Number of countries/regions: at least 188
Total patients recovered globally: 1,964,622

Latest reported numbers in the United States per Johns Hopkins University
There are at least 1,577,758 diagnosed cases in 50 states the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam.  This is more than in any other country.
U.S. deaths: at least 94,729.  New York state has the greatest number of reported deaths in the U.S., with 28,743.
U.S. total patients recovered: 298,418
U.S. total people tested: 13,056,206

The greatest number of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is in New York, with 356,458 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 19.5 million.  That is the most reported cases than in any other single region in the world.  New Jersey is next, with 151,586 reported cases out of a total population of 8.88 million.

Latest reported deaths per state
Visit https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html for the latest numbers.

School closures
For a state-by-state interactive map of current school closures, please visit the Education Week website, where numbers are updated once daily.

There are 98,277 public schools and 34,576 private schools in the U.S., according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Those schools educate almost 50.8 million public school students and 5.8 million private school students.

The latest headlines
Black Americans, Latinos nearly three times as likely to know someone who died of COVID-19
Though fewer than one in five Americans is likely to know someone who died from COVID-19 or its complications, those numbers are significantly higher for black Americans and Latinos.  A new ABC News/Ipsos poll, released today, shows 30% of black adults and nearly as many Latino adults, 26%, in America say they know someone who’s died of the coronavirus, or complications from the disease.  That number drops to 10% for white adults.  The findings are consistent with local and national data reported by states and cities and reviewed by ABC News that revealed racial and ethnic minorities suffer a disproportionate share of the negative health and economic outcomes from the coronavirus pandemic.  The poll results come as all 50 states have begun easing COVID-19 lockdown restrictions, and the U.S. death toll from the virus nears 100,000 -- 94,729 as of this morning, according to Johns Hopkins University.

US child vaccinations decrease amid COVID-19 fears
As COVID-19 lockdowns keep most Americans from visiting the hospital for anything other than an emergency, an unwanted – and ironic – consequence is that the number of children receiving routine vaccinations for other diseases has dropped in 20 states, according to a survey by ABC News.  ABC News contacted health officials in all 50 states, of which 20 responded and all of which said they were seeing the decline in childhood vaccinations.  In New York City, which has more coronavirus infections than any other city in the U.S., there’s been a 42% drop in vaccinations for kids two years old and younger, and a dramatic 91% vaccination drop for children aged two and older.  Other responding states are seeing declines of from 40% to nearly 80%.  Physicians fear the drop in vaccinations could result in a resurgence of illnesses than can generally be prevented or managed, such as flu and mumps, resulting in additional, preventable outbreaks of childhood illnesses as the nation continues to struggle to meet the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

State shuts down gym that defied mandatory closure order
New Jersey officials on Wednesday shut down the Atilis Gym in Bellmawr for repeatedly refusing to stay closed, as mandated by Gov. Phil Murphy's stay-at-home order.  Acting on behalf of the Camden County health department, gym owners Ian Smith and Frank Trumbetti were twice fined $2,000 this week for opening on Monday and Tuesday in defiance of the mandated lockdown.  Trumbetti vowed to a gathered crowd Tuesday morning, “I will not close my doors again unless I'm behind bars."  Trumbetti and Smith told Philadelphia TV station WPVI that the gym remained closed Thursday because the sewer backed up Wednesday.  He also said they were consulting with attorneys and weighing their legal options.  Gyms are considered especially high-risk for transmitting and contracting COVID-19 and are not generally considered essential businesses.

Good news!
Seven-year-old raises $4,000 for hospital workers by playing ukulele
Even if you’re not a fan of the ukulele, you’ve got to love this story.  Seven-year-old Lilyana Roman of Manchester, New Hampshire wanted to do her part to help out front-line medical workers at nearby Elliot Hospital.  As WMUR Manchester reports, Lilyana began playing ukulele in her front yard, asking neighbors to donate in return.  Her goal was to raise $500.  By the time she was done, she’d raised $4,000 in all.  "People would get scared and stay inside, so I thought I could give them money to get more tools to help people," Lilyana said, adding that she plans to keep on playing her ukulele as long as people keep giving.  Anyone not in the neighborhood who wants to make a donation can do so online at the Front Lines New Hampshire website – make sure you put “In honor of Lilyana” in the donation comments.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. 



Cesare Ferrari/iStock(NEW YORK) -- With COVID-19 dashing the world's spring and summer concert plans, Apple Music is stepping up to ease that major concert FOMO over Memorial Day weekend. 

Starting Saturday, May 23, the streaming service kicks off a three-day nonstop concert extravaganza where fans can relive some of the biggest performances in music history.  

Missed U2's 2009 performance at the Rose Bowl or Elton John's 2007 concert at Madison Square Garden?  Apple Music is bringing those major concerts and more to their 20-concert livestream event and will also give fans a front row seat to the action by also playing studio versions of all the songs. 

Kicking off the 72-hour nonstop At Home with Apple Music: Best Seat in the House event will be Lady Gaga's 2011 pit stop at Madison Square Garden during her The Monster Ball tour.  Coldplay will take the reigns next with their 2017 performance at São Paulo, Brazil.  Other acts featured that day will be Camila Cabello, Amy Winehouse, Coldplay and more.

While Saturday's stream focuses on pop and hip hop, Sunday, May 24 is all about rock, from classic to heavy metal. Pearl Jam's 2006 Immagine in Cornice starts the day, that will also feature shows from Metallica, Nine Inch Nails, U2, Nirvana and others.

Monday, May 25, wraps up the three-day event with Apple Music concluding with their "Legends" series, featuring the Eagles' 1994 Los Angeles stop during their Hell Freezes Over tour to Queen playing Live at Wembley '86.

Here's the complete schedule:

Saturday, May 23 -- Pop's Biggest Hitters
 Lady Gaga - The Monster Ball Tour Live at Madison Square Garden (New York City, USA 2011)
Coldplay - Live In São Paulo (São Paulo, BR 2017)
Amy Winehouse - Live at Porchester Hall (London, UK 2007)
Lil Wayne - Live at House of Blues Los Angeles (Los Angeles, USA 2008)
Tyler, the Creator - Apple Music Presents: Tyler, the Creator (Los Angeles, USA 2019)
J Balvin - Bruuttal (Medellín, CO 2017)
Camila Cabello - New Music Daily Presents: Camila Cabello (Los Angeles, USA 2019)
One Republic - Live in South Africa (Johannesburg, ZA 2015)

Sunday, May 24 -- Rock Heroes
Pearl Jam - Immagine in Cornice (multiple cities in Italy, 2006)
Metallica - Quebec Magnetic (Quebec City, CA 2009)
Rage Against the Machine - Live at Finsbury Park (London, UK 2010)
Nine Inch Nails - Beside You in Time (multiples US cities, 2006)
U2 - 360 at the Rose Bowl (Pasadena, USA 2009)
Nirvana - Live at Reading (Reading, UK 1992)

Monday, May 25 -- Legends
Eagles - Hell Freezes Over (Los Angeles, USA 1994)
Bob Marley - Uprising Live! (Dortmund, DE 1980)
Elton John - Live at Madison Square Garden (New York City, USA 2007)
The Rolling Stones - Hyde Park Live (London, UK 2013)
Queen - Live at Wembley '86 (London, UK 1986)
Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band - London Calling: Live at Hyde Park (London, UK 2009)

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



iStock/Gargonia (NEW YORK) -- New York State on Thursday updated the amount of cases linked to a new COVID-related inflammatory illness in children, announcing the numbers have risen to 157.  That represents a 53 percent spike.

Since New York reported the first case of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C,) as named by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25 other states have reported cases of the mysterious illness.

"The more we look, the more we find it," said New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, calling this new illness "more frightening than COVID respiratory illness in some ways because it inflames the heart."

Symptoms include persistent fever, abdominal pain, rash, enlarged lymph node on one side of the neck, irritability or sluggishness, swollen hands and feet, diarrhea and vomiting.

Because of the new illness, Cuomo strongly urged parents not to send their children to day camp until health officials have a better grip on this virus and understand "how widespread it is."

Ever since the first COVID-19 was reported in Wuhan, China, the virus has spread across the globe, infecting over five million people and killing nearly 330,000, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University.   Just two weeks a go, the rate of infected individuals worldwide crossed the four million threshold.

As nations around the world race to develop a vaccine, pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca announced Thursday that it is optimistic of a potential vaccine being developed by the University of Oxford.  Due to initial promising results, AstraZeneca has ordered 400 million doses, saying it could produce up to 1 billion doses and begin delivering them in September.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



Apple TV (NEW YORK) -- (NOTE LANGUAGE) The Apple TV workplace comedy series, Mythic Quest: Raven’s Banquet, will return on May 22 with a special COVID-19 inspired episode.

Shot entirely on iPhones, the show finds the team behind the biggest multiplayer video game of all-time tasked with working from home. To achieve this, the cast rehearsed, then later lighted and shot themselves from their homes on iPhones, with couriers later picking up and sanitizing each device before the footage was edited.

Show star and co-creator Rob McElhenney told ABC Audio, "What we tried to do from the very beginning was to make sure we made an episode that was at the very least fun and funny and would bring a certain amount of levity to people's lives when they're sitting in their house for the last three months and possibly the next month ahead."

He added, "[A]t best, to make people feel a little bit less alone and then maybe leave them with a sense of optimism and triumph that there's a group of people that work together on something and they succeeded. And it doesn't work unless they all do it, that if one person f***s it up, then the whole thing is ruined. I think there's something fun about that."

So will there be an Always Sunny in Philadelphia quarantine episode?

"Yes," revealed McElhenney, who is also the co-creator of that show. "The difference is...that in Mythic Quest the characters are being very respectful...we're being very respectful of the science and the reality of where the world is. The Sunny characters...I don't think that they believe in science unless it suits their needs and they wouldn't be respectful of anything or anybody but themselves. So I think it's a completely different episode. But it's one we'll have to explore." 

Also unlike the characters on Sunny would do, the cast of Mythic Quest raised $300,000 for NGO Mercy Corps' COVID-19 relief program, a figure that was matched by McElhenney and his Sunny co-star and wife Kaitlin Olson, for a total of $600,000.


Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



iStock/SeanShot(NEW YORK) -- With millions of people working from home due to COVID-19, "workplace casual" has taken on a whole new meaning: A new survey says two in three Americans can't remember the last time they actually wore real pants. 

Four in five respondents said their nine-to-five uniform is now either PJs or other comfy clothes.  

The non-scientific survey of 2,000 Americans commissioned by MattressFirm also offered peeks into that working-from-home life. For example, 44% said despite their lack of a commute, they've still clocked in late to work.

Six in 10 say they've taken a nap during the day; nearly six in 10 say they work from their beds all day.

That being said, 70% said they’ve been more productive working from home than they were when they were at the office. 

Between the comfy clothes, no traffic and naps, perhaps it's no surprise that 70% of the Americans polled say they preferred working from home. 

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



glegorly/iStock(NEW YORK) -- An additional 2,438,000 Americans applied for unemployment benefits the week ending May 16, according to numbers released this morning by the U.S. Department of Labor

The number represents a decrease of 249,000 from the previous week’s numbers, which were revised down by 294,000, from 2,981,000 to 2,687,000. 

Some 38.6 million Americans have now applied for unemployment benefits in the nine weeks since the COVID-19 virus began impacting the economy, meaning about one in four people in the U.S. workforce have lost their jobs. 

Millions of eligible Americans are still waiting to receive their government economic stimulus benefit, with some estimates declaring that about 60 percent of benefits have been paid out so far, with the possibility that some families won’t receive theirs for months to come.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



Photo by Elaine Cromie/Getty Images(MICHIGAN) -- The growing protest against Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer's strict COVID-19 lockdown orders got downright snippy Wednesday, when dozens of stylists showed up to the state capital to perform al fresco cuts as an act of civil disobedience that's been dubbed Operation Haircut.

Over the past month, thousands of Michiganders have rallied against Whitmer's prohibitions, which prevent citizens from visiting their vacation homes, and prohibit people from buying supplies like house paint and seeds for their gardens. 

Barbers and other stylists plied their trade for free for fellow protestors who sat in folding chairs, reports ABC affiliate WXYZ-TV. Footage shows State Troopers warning -- and eventually issuing -- a ticket to one of the stylists, a woman named Angela.

"This governor is drunk on power," she said. "We have a right to make a living." 

The crowded protest was organized to support Karl Manke, a barber in Owosso, MI who defied Whitmer's orders and continued to serve his clients -- while wearing a mask.

In response to his flouting of the lockdown order, Whitmer pulled Manke's license to operate his shop. 



Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/WireImage

(NEW YORK) -- For those of you who've wished they could watch Rocky with the Italian Stallion himself, wish no more: Sylvester Stallone is hosting an online watch party of his Oscar-winning film on Facebook this evening. 

At 7 p.m. Eastern time, you'll be able to watch and chat along with Sly live on movie studio MGM's Facebook page -- all for a good cause. 

The event, part of Creative Artist Agency's Screenings with the Stars series, will benefit communities affected by the COVID-19 crisis.

 

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



(NEW YORK) -- Here's the latest information on the COVID-19 coronavirus as of 9:30 a.m. ET.

Latest reported numbers globally per Johns Hopkins University
Global diagnosed cases: 5,019,676
Global deaths: 328,565.  The United States has the most deaths of any single country, with 93,439.
Number of countries/regions: at least 188
Total patients recovered globally: 1,913,103

Latest reported numbers in the United States per Johns Hopkins University
There are at least 1,551,853 diagnosed cases in 50 states the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam.  This is more than in any other country.
U.S. deaths: at least 93,439.  New York state has the greatest number of reported deaths in the U.S., with 28,636.
U.S. total patients recovered: 294,312
U.S. total people tested: 12,647,791

The greatest number of reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S. is in New York, with 354,370 confirmed cases out of a total state population of 19.5 million.  That is the most reported cases than in any other single region in the world.  New Jersey is next, with 150,776 reported cases out of a total population of 8.88 million.

Latest reported deaths per state
Visit https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html for the latest numbers.

School closures
For a state-by-state interactive map of current school closures, please visit the Education Week website, where numbers are updated once daily.

There are 98,277 public schools and 34,576 private schools in the U.S., according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Those schools educate almost 50.8 million public school students and 5.8 million private school students.

The latest headlines
Global COVID-19 infections now exceed five million
The number of confirmed COVID-19 infections worldwide has now exceeded five million, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.  That increase represents a jump of 106,000 cases in 24 hours, which is the largest single-day increase since the pandemic first originated in Wuhan, China, said WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus in a Wednesday statement.  The number of COVID-19 cases worldwide has been increasing by one million roughly every two weeks since April 1, when one million global cases were recorded.  That number was two million by April 15, three million by April 27, and four million by May 9.  The United States still has the most confirmed infections of any single nation, with 1,551,853 and 93,439 deaths.  At least 1,913,103 people have died of the virus worldwide as of Monday morning.

Another 2.4 million apply for unemployment as pandemic keeps businesses closed
An additional 2,438,000 Americans applied for unemployment benefits the week ending May 16, according to numbers released this morning by the U.S. Department of Labor.  The number represents a decrease of 249,000 from the previous week’s numbers, which were revised down by 294,000, from 2,981,000 to 2,687,000.  Some 38.6 million Americans have now applied for unemployment benefits in the nine weeks since the COVID-19 virus began impacting the economy, meaning about one in four people in the U.S. workforce have lost their jobs.  Millions of eligible Americans are still waiting to receive their government economic stimulus benefit, with some estimates declaring that about 60 percent of benefits have been paid out so far, with the possibility that some families won’t receive theirs for months to come.

Study shows earlier national lockdown could have saved 36,000 lives
A new Columbia University study shows that had the U.S. instituted COVID-19 lockdown protocols just one week earlier, some 36,000 lives could have been saved.  And if the protocols had begun March 1, 83% of COVID-19 deaths in America could have been avoided, the study claims.  That translates to roughly 54,000 fewer deaths by early May.  The New York Times reports researchers at the university based their estimates on modeling that shows how social distancing slows the transmission of the virus.  Most of the U.S. began closing schools and businesses and practicing social distancing in late March.  The United States has the most confirmed COVID-19 infections of any single nation, with 1,551,853 and 93,439 deaths, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.  All 50 states have now begun to loosen lockdown restrictions, even as medical experts warn it could lead to a resurgence of coronavirus infections and deaths in the weeks to come.

Good news!
Texas man meets preacher whose plasma donation saved his life
Things weren’t looking good for Jose Martinez last month.  As WFAA Dallas reports, the 42-year-old was admitted to Texas Health Fort Worth and diagnosed with COVID-19, which soon worsened to the point he was placed on a ventilator.  None of the hospital’s treatments were helping, so pulmonologist Dr. John Burke called Father Robert Pace, the county’s first COVID-19 case, since recovered and sent home.  Pace immediately agreed to Dr. Burke’s request for him to donate his plasma to help Martinez.  One week after receiving the plasma infusion, and after 11 days on a ventilator, Martinez walked out of the hospital.  Wednesday, Martinez and Father Pace met in person for the first time – wearing face masks and practicing social distancing, of course.  Martinez thanked Pace for saving his life, with both urging others who have recovered from COVID-19 to donate their plasma, to help others.  Said Pace, “I wanted to do whatever I could to help them, because people were dying from this.”

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. 



onurdongel/iStock(NEW YORK) -- The number of confirmed COVID-19 infections worldwide has now exceeded five million, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University

That increase represents a jump of 106,000 cases in 24 hours, which is the largest single-day increase since the pandemic first originated in Wuhan, China, said WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus in a Wednesday statement. 

The number of COVID-19 cases worldwide has been increasing by one million roughly every two weeks since April 1, when one million global cases were recorded.  That number was two million by April 15, three million by April 27, and four million by May 9. 

The United States still has the most confirmed infections of any single nation, with 1,551,853 and 93,439 deaths. 

At least 1,913,103 people have died of the virus worldwide as of Monday morning.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



JUNG YEON-JE/AFP via Getty Images(SEOUL) -- What could possibly be wrong with a soccer stadium full of polite fans, tastefully dressed in their home team’s respective colors, wearing masks and practicing proper social distancing?  Nothing -- unless they’re sex dolls.

That stunt drew South Korea’s FC Seoul soccer club a fine of $81,410 from the Korea Professional Football League on Wednesday -- the most the K League has ever fined a team, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Representatives from FC Seoul claim the team thought it was using about 25 regular mannequins to fill the stadium, which was empty due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  The league, however, isn't buying the excuse and is insisting the team had plenty of opportunities to realize the mistake.

FC Seoul is accepting its punishment, saying they “apologize deeply to all those concerned about the unfortunate situation that occurred…We will review our internal procedures to ensure this does not happen again.”

The club is also asking police for an investigation into the supplier.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



On Air Now
George Noory
George Noory
1:00am - 5:00am
Coast To Coast
Email Comments
My Profile
WOND Facebook

Community Calendar
Weather