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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesBy JON HAWORTH and ELLA TORRES, ABC News

(NEW YORK) --  The death of George Floyd, a black man who died on Memorial Day after he was pinned down by a white Minnesota police officer, has sparked outrage and protests in Minneapolis and across the United States.

Manslaughter and third-degree murder charges have been filed against Derek Chauvin, the officer who prosecutors say held his knee on Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes.

Chauvin and the other three officers at the scene have been fired. The Department of Justice is investigating.

This story is being updated throughout the day Wednesday. Please check back for updates. All times Eastern:

11:38 p.m.: NYC curfew to remain

New York City will remain under a curfew from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. through June 7, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced. The mayor said he hopes to lift the curfew in time for the city's phase one of reopening.

Restrictions on transportation will remain in place throughout the week.

De Blasio said that the protests throughout the city last night were calmer than before.

The mayor said that the public needed to turn their attention back to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

"As important as the issues are being addressed [in the protests], the single most important thing is the battle against the coronavirus," de Blasio said.

He encouraged people to stay home to the maximum extent possible, practice social distancing consistently and wear face coverings at all times.

9:36 a.m.: UK police stand with those 'appalled' by Floyd's death

Chief constables from forces across the United Kingdom, the chair of the National Police Chiefs' Council, the chief executive of the College of Policing and the president of the Police Superintendents' Association have issued a joint statement saying they stand with those "appalled and horrified" at George Floyd's death.

"We are also appalled to see the violence and damage that has happened in so many US cities since then," according to the statement.

The police said justice and accountability should follow.

"In the UK we have a long established tradition of policing by consent, working in communities to prevent crime and solve problems. Officers are trained to use force proportionately, lawfully and only when absolutely necessary. We strive to continuously learn and improve. We will tackle bias, racism or discrimination wherever we find it," the statement said.

The law enforcement officials acknowledged that there is more to do to make relationships between police and the public better.

"Every day, up and down the country, officers and staff are working to strengthen those relationships and address concerns. Only by working closely with our communities do we build trust and help keep people safe," the statement read.

Around when that statement was released, police officials also publicized statistics that showed black people in London were more likely than their white counterparts to be fined or arrested for breaching coronavirus lockdown rules.

8:56 a.m.: Peaceful protests in Massachusetts town end with clashes

Brockton, Massachusetts, Mayor Robert Sullivan addressed protests that began peaceful but ended with confrontations between officers and civilians.

Sullivan said one state trooper was injured by a projectile during the protests.

Peaceful protests dominated the day, but around 8:30 p.m. a person from the crowd set off fireworks and others threw water bottles and rocks at police, according to ABC Boston affiliate WCVB-TV. Police responded with tear gas canisters to disperse the group.

Some arrests were made, according to Sullivan. He said there was damage reported elsewhere in the town, including a Dunkin' Donuts that was set on fire and vandalized.

Even as tensions rose in the evening, there was still peace. At one point, four people kneeled with hands up in front of a line of officers.

One man who kneeled told WCVB he "had to stand up for what he believes in," but didn't want violence.

"We come in peace," the man who only identified himself as a Brockton resident told the station. "We don't want war. We go home; they go home, and everyone is all peaceful. That is all we want."

5:50 a.m.: NYPD arrest 280 people, looting and vandalism on the decline

The New York Police Department made about 280 arrests during Tuesday night/Wednesday morning protests, a lower tally than previous nights, as the city came under an 8 p.m. curfew and stopped for-hire vehicles, CitiBikes and rental scooters that vandals had used to cause trouble.

There were fewer officers injured as well with only two suffering minor injuries.

There was less vandalism than there has been during previous nights as police sealed off parts of Manhattan even before the curfew took effect.

A standoff on the Manhattan Bridge ended without incident when 5,000 demonstrators returned to Brooklyn after they had been prevented from entering Manhattan.

3:04 a.m.: More than 9,000 people arrested across the country

More than 9,000 people have been arrested in protests across the country since George Floyd's death, according to reports.

The events leading up to Floyd's death were filmed, went viral and has been the catalyst for protests nationwide.

Police were called at around 8 p.m. on May 25 by an employee of the Cup Foods convenience store alleging that a customer used a counterfeit bill to pay for cigarettes and that the person appeared drunk, according to the 911 log released by the Minneapolis Police Department.

The employee went to the car outside the store where the customer was sitting and asked him to return the cigarettes, but was denied, according to the 911 call transcript.

The employee described the customer as a 6-foot-6 black man, which was Floyd's height, and repeated to the 911 operator that he appeared drunk.

Around eight minutes later, Minneapolis police officers Thomas Lane and J.A. Kueng arrived at the shop and approached Floyd and two others in the car, according to the criminal complaint. A few minutes after that, officers Derek Chauvin and Tou Thoa arrived to help arrest Floyd, which led to Chauvin placing his knee on Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes, the criminal complaint said.

All four officers were fired, but as of Tuesday afternoon, Chauvin is the only one to have been arrested. He was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. Minnesota's Department of Human Rights filed civil rights charges against the Minneapolis Police Department Tuesday.

1:50 a.m.: 200 arrested in Houston; Police stress that majority of protesters were peaceful

The Houston Police Department announced that they made more than 200 arrests in downtown Houston yesterday and last night involving people engaged in criminal conduct, including throwing rocks and bottles at officers, and people who refused to clear the streets when they were ordered to do so.

"This is an extremely low number of arrests considering the thousands of people in our community who marched and demonstrated peacefully today," the HPD said in a tweet. "We're not aware of any significant property damage or injuries. We will have updated arrest numbers/info later this morning."

1:09 a.m.: Prince George's County police suspends three officers for use of force


After seeing cellphone footage of two officers using excessive force while detaining a suspect at a Langley Park gas station in Maryland, Chief Hank Stawinski of the Prince George's County Police Department and the department’s executive command staff made the decision to immediately suspend the two involved officers and their supervisor while the incident is investigated.

In the video, while attempting to handcuff the suspect, one of the officers can be seen kicking the suspect twice.

“I am sorry and I am angry. I am sharing the video in the interest of transparency. During my tenure as Chief of Police, four officers have been criminally prosecuted for assault. This will be thoroughly investigated and in keeping with past practice, the findings will be referred to the Office of the State’s Attorney,” said Chief Hank Stawinski.

The preliminary investigation revealed the officer who used force observed an assault and attempted to detain the involved suspects. After a foot chase that ended at the gas station, he was able to handcuff one suspect. He is then seen on the video taking the second suspect to the ground.

When a backup officer arrived, that second officer assisted the first officer in the apprehension. During that attempt to handcuff the suspect, the first officer kicked the suspect. The two suspects were ultimately released when the assault victim could not be located.

12:31 a.m.: DC National Guard has directed an investigation into use of medical helicopter to target, disperse DC protesters

The Washington, D.C. National Guard has announced that they are directing an investigation into the actions of their rotary aviation assets on June 1 after it was reported that their medical helicopters were used to target protesters.

According to The Washington Post, numerous videos were posted on social media showing a Lakota medevac helicopter with Red Cross markings hovering very low over demonstrators, possibly in an effort to disperse the crowds.

The use of a medical helicopter in a law enforcement capacity may violate military law and regulations.

"Our priority is the safety of our Guardsmen who support civil authorities," the DCNG said in a tweet. "We are dedicated to ensuring the safety of citizens and their right to protest."

12:04 a.m.: Amid protests over racial injustice, Ferguson, the site of the shooting of Michael Brown, elects first African American mayor

The city of Ferguson, the site of 2014 unrest and protests over racial justice after Michael Brown, an 18-year old black man, was killed by a white police officer, elected its first African American mayor Tuesday, Ella Jones.

Jones, a councilwoman in the predominantly black city, is also the first woman to hold the position, according to the St. Louis Dispatch. She will succeed James Knowles III, a term-limited white, Republican mayor who defeated Jones in 2017.

This year, Jones defeated another councilwoman, Heather Robinett, by six points, according to unofficial results from county election officials.

10:39 p.m.: Trump objects to GOP criticism of church photo op

President Donald Trump lashed out at fellow Republicans who have criticized his decision to clear protesters out of Lafayette Park Monday evening prior to a photo op in front of St. John's Episcopal Church.

He called out Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, James Lankford of Oklahoma and Ben Sasse of Nebraska, who were all critical of the violent removal of peaceful protesters with flashbangs and smoke canisters.

"You got it wrong! If the protesters were so peaceful, why did they light the Church on fire the night before?" he tweeted, though it was a different group of protesters and Monday's group had not been violent. "People liked my walk to this historic place of worship! Sen. Susan Collins, Sen. James Lankford, Sen. Ben Sasse."

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



Ovidiu Dugulan/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 381,000 people worldwide.

Over 6.3 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations' outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 1.8 million diagnosed cases and at least 106,274 deaths.

Here's how the news is developing Wednesday. All times Eastern:

10:30 a.m.: Over 600 nurses worldwide have died from COVID-19, group says

More than 230,000 health workers around the world have contracted the novel coronavirus since the start of the global pandemic, while over 600 nurses have died from it, according to a new analysis by the International Council of Nurses.

The figures show that an average of 7% of all COVID-19 cases worldwide are among health care workers.

The International Council of Nurses, which represents more than 130 national nursing associations with 20 million members worldwide, said the analysis is based on data from its associations, official figures and media reports from a limited number of countries," since "there is no systemic and standardized record" of the global number of nurses and health care workers who have tested positive for COVID-19 or succumbed to the disease.

The group is calling on governments to record the number of COVID-19 infections and deaths among health care staff as well as take whatever measures are needed to protect them.

‘Without this data we do not know the true cost of COVID-19, and that will make us less able to tackle other pandemics in the future," ICN CEO Howard Catton said in a statement Wednesday.

8:49 a.m.: Data shows black people in London more likely to be fined or arrested over lockdown breaches

Black people in London were more likely than their white counterparts to be fined or arrested for breaching coronavirus lockdown rules, according to police statistics released Wednesday.

While enforcing the new restrictions imposed to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus, London's Metropolitan Police Service issued 973 fines between March 27 and May 14. The figures show that white people, who make up 59% of the U.K. capital's population, received 444 fines, or 45.6%. Black people, who make up 12% of the population, received 253 fines, or 26%. Asian people, who make up 18% of the population, received 220 fines, or 22.6%, according to the report.

During the same time period, police only arrested 36 people for breaking coronavirus restrictions where no other criminality was a factor. However, police made 711 additional arrests where other criminality was the primary reason and, as a result of that criminality, the individuals were also in breach of the lockdown rules. The figures show that white people accounted for 38% of those arrests while black people accounted for 31%.

In total, more white people were fined or arrested than other individual ethnic groups. However, when compared with the composition of the resident population, higher proportions of black and minority ethnic groups were issued fines or arrested across London as a whole.

"The reasons for this are likely to be complex and reflect a range of factors," the Metropolitan Police Service said in a statement Wednesday, alongside the release of the report. "This includes interactions between the areas subject to significant proactive policing activity targeting crime hot-spots and both the variation in the age-profile and geographical distribution of ethnic groups in London."

The police force, which is Britain's largest, noted its officers "have reported that in most interactions once they have explained that an individual or group were in breach they have followed police advice without the need for the use of our enforcement powers."

"Our aim has been to protect London, and not to unnecessarily criminalize where we can avoid it," Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner Mark Simmons said in a statement Wednesday. "We have seen, overall, good compliance when we have intervened, meaning in most cases the need for issuing a Fixed Penalty Notice or arrest has been unnecessary. I hope Londoners will be reassured as a result of the low volume of COVID-19 related enforcement that we have been using the new powers only when we have absolutely needed to."

7:22 a.m.: Oklahoma State linebacker tests positive after attending protest

Oklahoma State University linebacker Amen Ogbongbemiga said he has tested positive for COVID-19 after attending a protest in Tulsa.

"After attending a protest in Tulsa AND being well protective of myself, I have tested positive for COVID-19," Ogbongbemiga, who will be a senior this fall, wrote on Twitter Tuesday night. "Please, if you are going to protest, take care of yourself and stay safe."

Mass protests have taken place in every U.S. state following the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died on May 25 in Minneapolis shortly after a white police officer was filmed kneeling on his neck for nearly nine minutes as three other officers stood by.

The Minneapolis Police Department has since fired all four officers, and the one seen pinning Floyd down, Derek Chauvin, has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. However, protesters are calling for the three other officers to be charged and are decrying the overall treatment of black Americans by police.

The number of people who have taken to the streets in the days since Floyd's death has been in the hundreds of thousands. Although many protesters have worn face masks and some have distributed hand sanitizer, they have been gathering in close proximity, forgoing social distancing guidelines that help prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.

In an interview published Monday on Politico, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams warned of new clusters of cases of the highly contagious disease as a result of the nationwide protests.

"Based on the way the disease spreads," Adams said, "there is every reason to expect that we will see new clusters and potentially new outbreaks moving forward."

6:16 a.m.: Russia reports under 9,000 new cases

Russia's coronavirus headquarters said Wednesday it had registered 8,536 new cases of COVID-19 and 178 deaths in the past 24 hours.

The country's tally now stands at 432,277 diagnosed cases with 5,215 deaths. Moscow, the capital, is the hardest-hit city in the country, accounting for about half of all infections.

The latest daily caseload is down from a peak of 11,656 new infections reported on May 11, during which Russia registered over 10,000 new cases per day over a 12-day period. Since then, the daily number of new infections has hovered around 9,000.

Russia has third-highest number of cases in the world, behind Brazil and the United States, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.

5:23 a.m.: UN reports first coronavirus death of Rohingya refugee

A Rohingya refugee who contracted the novel coronavirus in the world's largest refugee camp has died, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

It's the first known coronavirus-related death of a Rohingya refugee.

The UNHCR said the refugee, who was not named, tested positive for COVID-19 in one of the densely-packed camps near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. The sprawling camps and surrounding makeshift settlements are home to nearly one million Rohingya refugees who fled ethnic violence and persecution in neighboring Myanmar, where they are a stateless Muslim minority group.

The first known COVID-19 cases in the camps were confirmed last month. One was a Rohingya refugee and the other was a Bangladeshi citizen.

Bangladesh currently has more than 52,000 diagnosed cases of the disease with at least 746 deaths, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.

3:45 a.m.: US should have 100 million doses of vaccine by end of year, Fauci says

The United States should have 100 million doses of one potential vaccine for COVID-19 by the end of the year, according to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top medical expert on the coronavirus pandemic.

"We're going to start manufacturing doses of the vaccines way before we even know that the vaccine works, so that by the end of the year the prediction of the statistical analysis and the projection of cases indicate that we may know whether its effective, efficacious or not by maybe November, December, which means that by that time we hopefully would have close to a 100 million doses," Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a key member of the White House coronavirus task force, said Tuesday during a live video interview with the Journal of the American Medical Association.

"And by the beginning of 2021, we hope to have a couple of hundred million doses," he added. "So it isn't as if we're going to make the vaccine show its effective and then have to wait a year to rev up to millions and millions of doses. Thats going to be done as we're testing the vaccine."

A number of clinical trials for COVID-19 vaccine candidates are well underway around the world.

The third and final phase of trials testing an experimental vaccine developed by Massachusetts-based biotech firm Moderna will begin in July. A few other vaccine candidates, including one developed by U.K.-based pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca, are also showing promise, according to Fauci.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



DNY59/iStockBy AARON KATERSKY and CHRISTINA CARREGA, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- A 13-year-old boy charged in connection to the stabbing death of Barnard College student Tessa Majors is expected to plead guilty Wednesday in family court.

The juvenile is one of three teenagers accused of fatally stabbing Majors during a mugging gone wrong last December in Morningside Park.

Majors, 18, was stabbed several times before she staggered up a flight of stairs and uttered “help me, I’m being robbed,” authorities said.

Two 14-year-olds, Rashaun Weaver and Luchiano Lewis, have been charged as adults. Their cases are still pending in Manhattan Criminal Court.

This is a developing story. Check back later for more details.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



Kameleon007/iStockBy JACK DATE, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- There were 59 mass shootings in May, the highest monthly total ever tallied since the Gun Violence Archive (GVA), a nonprofit research group, began tracking the data in 2013.

GVA defines a mass shooting as an incident in which four or more people are shot, not including the shooter.

Forty people were killed in mass shootings in May and 249 were shot, a period during which much of the country was practicing social distancing due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

On May 17 in Saint Matthews, South Carolina, three family members, including a 12-year-old, were killed and another was wounded in a domestic violence incident, police said.

According to police, 13 people were shot during one incident following a memorial service for another murder victim in Bogalusa, Louisiana, on May 16.

On May 13, five people were shot in Albuquerque, New Mexico, including a woman who was seven months pregnant, according to local news reports.

May’s total for mass shootings is double any previous month’s total this year.

GVA has tracked 158 mass shooting incidents year-to-date with 641 people shot and 146 people killed.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



marvinh/iStockBy CHRIS LUMSDEN, ABC News

(ATLANTA) -- Twenty-five students received the surprise of a lifetime on their front doorsteps when they learned they had been accepted into a prestigious program at Harvard University.

The Harvard Debate Council Diversity Project usually has a grand surprise ceremony to reveal all of the students accepted into the program each year. While they can't celebrate together this year due to COVID-19, program founder and assistant debate coach Brandon Fleming didn't let the pandemic ruin the tradition.

Fleming packed his bags, hopped in his car and drove more than 200 miles around the Atlanta metropolitan area to the doorstep of each student to notify and congratulate them on their acceptance into the 2021 class of the highly selective program. He said the three-day, 21-hour road trip was worth it after seeing the excitement on each of their faces.

"They weren't happy because they won a million dollars -- that excitement came from an educational opportunity," Fleming told Good Morning America. "Seeing their faces light up reminded me of what I was called to do."

Just prior, the students signed on to what they thought was another stage of the Zoom interview process. Little did they know there was a surprise waiting outside. On the video call, Fleming told them to come to the front door since he happened to be in their neighborhoods. Once they opened their doors, he notified them of their acceptance and the celebration began.

"Excitement immediately rushed through my body once he popped the confetti," Jonah Ruffin, 14, said.

Jonah has always been at the top of his class and knew this program could give him an extra opportunity to expand his knowledge. After several rounds of interviews and weeks of anticipation, he couldn't contain his happiness when Fleming showed up at his doorstep with the surprising news.

"I'm really blessed with this once-in-a-lifetime experience," he said. "The whole surprise was really unexpected and it couldn't have gone any better."

One by one, Fleming gave each student the celebration they deserved and welcomed them into the organization.

"I wanted their experiences to be magical moments they never forget," he said.

The Harvard Diversity Project, based in Atlanta, aims to recruit, train and matriculate highly motivated high school students of color into a summer debate residency at the school. Fleming, once an at-risk teen who overcame violence and drugs, said debate saved his life by transforming his ability to think. He began the organization in 2017, and many from the region soon took interest. With thousands of applicants each year, the program has about a 1% acceptance rate.

"Through debate, our students are able to find themselves because they're able to find their voice," Fleming said. "Most of them have now gone off to Ivy Leagues or elite universities on full scholarships."

Starting in August, these 25 scholars will spend 36 weeks preparing for next year's annual international debate tournament at Harvard. In July 2021, they will face off against 400 elite debaters from more than 25 countries. Fleming's team has won every year since the inception of the program.

The organization hopes to create a bridge to success for African American students in the Atlanta region and give them the tools to strive in the academic world.

Emani Stanton, 16, who was on the waitlist for a short period of time, didn't lose hope and was determined to get in. Being accepted into this program now means that she can help shift the narrative pertaining to young black men and women.

"I despise the idea that African Americans cannot be scholarly without separating their culture from their education," she told "GMA." "Now I have the opportunity to change the perspective."

These newly accepted students are now ready to start their preparation for next year's debate. After taking the multi-day road trip to congratulate each of them personally, Fleming is eager to train this diverse group of future leaders.

"They're ecstatic about their education and that's what we, as educators, should all hope to see in every child," he said.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



ABC NewsBy STEPHANIE WASH, SABINA GHEBREMEDHIN and EVA PILGRIM, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- George Floyd was at his daughter Gianna Floyd's side from the moment she let her first cry out into the world.

Just off work, Floyd had received the call that Gianna, now 6 years old, was due to be born. A tired Floyd slept through hours of mother Roxie Washington’s painful labor. It was Gianna’s entrance into the world that would finally awaken him.

"She cried and he heard her,” Washington told ABC News' Good Morning America. "They wiped her off and they gave her to him. I mean that was his baby. He wanted that moment though. He really really wanted that moment. He looked forward to that."

Now Gianna feels a void with her father gone. In an interview with Good Morning America she said she wants people to know "kinda that I miss him."

Washington described Floyd as a provider that did everything for their daughter.

"He just wanted her to have the best,” Washington said. "We were struggling so he did what he had to do as a man and he had to come here [to Minneapolis] to work. And he said I’m going to come back and get y’all."

"I mean, that was his baby. He loved his little girl,” Washington said.

And Gianna loved him. If you ask Gianna Floyd what her father was like, she’ll tell you that he was fun and played with her.

"He would put her on his shoulders," Washington said. "She didn't have to play with nobody else because daddy was gonna play all day long. And they played. They had fun."

Washington received the devastating news of Floyd’s death from her niece, and a close friend of Floyd’s would later confirm it.

"I watched it only for a moment," Washington said of the bystander video showing Floyd’s death. "I couldn't believe that somebody was on him like that. And then in that moment, you know, because I loved him so much I wanted to help him or I wish I could’ve been there to help him. And just hearing him begging for his life."

Coupled with the recent death of her mother, the loss of Floyd is hard to talk about for Washington, especially with their daughter. But she faced that conversation when Gianna knew something was wrong.

"I had closed the door so I could watch the news. I went in the room and I said ‘Gianna, why did you open the door?’ She said ‘Something's going on with my family,’” Washington told ABC News' Eva Pilgrim. “She said ‘I hear them. I hear them saying my Daddy’s name.’”

Washington says she still hasn’t found the words to explain how her father died.

“She doesn’t know what happened. I told her Daddy died because he couldn’t breathe,” Washington said.

Now, all Gianna Floyd has left of her father George are memories. But it is the unrealized moments that are shattering to Washington.

“He will never see her grow up, graduate. He will never walk her down the aisle. If there’s a problem she’s having and needs a dad, she does not have that anymore,” Washington said at a press conference on Tuesday in Minneapolis.

“I want justice for him, ‘cause he was good. No matter what anybody thinks, he was good. And this is the proof that he was a good man,” Washington said, looking down at their daughter.

That goodness was evident when Gianna proudly shared her dream during the GMA interview.

“I know what I want to be when I grow up,” Gianna called out. “A doctor. So I can help people.”

Washington is heartbroken that Floyd will never get to see their daughter chase her dreams.

“They took her Dad,” she said. “My heart is broke for my baby. It’s broke.”

Floyd’s close friend, retired NBA player Stephen Jackson, accompanied the family on Tuesday, vowing to step in and help Floyd’s family.

“Why do we have to see her pain? Why do we have to see a daughter getting raised without a father?” Jackson asked.

Jackson, turning to Washington, said: “There’s a lot of stuff that you said that he’s going to miss that I’m going to be there for. I’m going to walk her down the aisle. I'm going to be there for her. I’m going to be here to wipe your tears … Floyd might not be here but I’m going to be here for her.”

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



ABC NewsBy MAX GOLEMBO, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- Severe weather has moved through a wide swath of land overnight all the way from Colorado to New York.

There were nine reported tornadoes Tuesday from Colorado to Minnesota and damaging winds of up to 74 mph were reported in Iowa overnight.

In Minnesota and Nebraska, huge hail as large as baseball sized fell in the area damaging cars and property.

Flash flooding was reported overnight in Buffalo, New York, where some cars were stuck in the flood waters.

The same storm system that brought all the severe weather to the Midwest will stretch Wednesday from New York City to Rapid City.

The biggest threat for straight line damaging winds and a few tornadoes will be in the Northeast from New York City to Philadelphia Wednesday afternoon.

Severe storms will also be possible from Dakotas to Ohio Valley where damaging winds and hail will be the biggest threat.

We are watching Tropical Storm Cristobal Wednesday morning as it meanders near Mexico and brings deadly flash flooding to Central America and Mexico.

Cristobal has winds of 60 mph Wednesday morning, making it a strong tropical storm.

After meandering near Mexico for the next few days, Cristobal could weaken as it interacts with the land there.

Depending on how much it weakens in Mexico over the next few days, this will determine its strengthen and size as it moves towards the U.S. by the end of the weekend.

By Friday night into Saturday, Cristobal is forecast to regain its strength and move north towards the Gulf Coast of the United States.

By Sunday night, Cristobal will approach the central Gulf Coast as a tropical storm with winds possible around 65 mph.

The biggest threat with Cristobal for the United States will be flooding rain, storm surge and gusty winds.

The spaghetti models for Cristobal indicates that the storm will strike somewhere in the central Gulf Coast by the end of the weekend into early next week.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



tillsonburg/iStockBy JOSH MARGOLIN and AARON KATERSKY, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- The New York Police Department's Intelligence Bureau is collecting license plate numbers from vehicles that carried vandals, looters and thieves around Manhattan in the last two days, a police official told ABC News.

Some of those already being tracked down were seen outside storefronts with sledgehammers, crowbars and power tools in brazen shows of planning and organization as they used the ongoing protests over the death of George Floyd as cover for their crimes.

One of the numerous police reports from eyewitnesses came from Carla Murphy, who lives in Chelsea.

Murphy, in an interview Tuesday, said she started hearing commotion from mobs of people along her street and neighboring streets about 10:30 p.m. Monday night. She first watched from her building and then went down to the street and saw organized groups of people working together to break in to store after store in the West Side neighborhood.

"Cars would drive up, let off the looters, unload power tools and suitcases and then the cars would drive away," she said. "Then the cars would come back pick them up and then drive off to the next spot. They seemed to know exactly where they were going. Some of the people were local, but there were a lot of out-of-towners."

Murphy said she saw license plates from New Jersey and Pennsylvania and drivers had not even tried to hide their tags.

By the time Murphy said she got through to 911, dispatchers said they would send police but they were swamped. She then went to the 10th Precinct, where she said a cop told her, "Yeah, we're getting the resources to get over there."

They didn't show up until 1 a.m., she said.

Officials acknowledged what was obvious from live news reports: They were overwhelmed as the looting broke out Monday night. But by Tuesday night, police brass had already put out orders to use the extraordinary technological arsenal available to the NYPD to hunt down those who turned protests into open season on merchants from local liquor stores to Macy's flagship.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo was critical of the NYPD's response to looting during a press conference Tuesday.

"The NYPD and the mayor did not do their job last night. I believe that," Cuomo said. “The police in New York City were not effective in doing their job last night. Period."

Detectives in New York City have access to a wide network of city-owned license-plate readers and security cameras on top of thousands of private-sector surveillance systems that are looped in to the NYPD architecture. Investigators are also collecting surveillance images from as many vandalized and looted stores as possible as they try to identify the suspects.

The culprits are believed to be a combination of outside agitators, career criminals and gang members. Police said many of the perpetrators seemed to display a talent for staying a step ahead of cops with an elaborate scouting and signaling system built on text messages, social media apps and lookouts.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



kali9/iStockBy ANTHONY RIVAS, ABC News

(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) -- Authorities in Louisville, Kentucky, released additional video footage Tuesday showing what they claim is David McAtee, who was shot dead by law enforcement earlier this week, firing his gun first.

McAtee, who owned YaYa's BBQ near the corner of South 26th Street and Broadway, and whose mother called him a "community pillar," was shot and killed at around 12:15 a.m. Monday outside of his business.

The Louisville Metro Police Department and National Guard were working to disperse protests throughout the city when they were dispatched to break up a large crowd at Dino's Food Mart across the street from McAtee's business, according to police, who say the officers were returning fire when McAtee was killed.

Interim Chief of Police Robert Schroeder said during a press conference Tuesday that additional video footage taken from McAtee's business and an adjoining business "appears to show McAtee firing a gun outside his business door as officers using pepper balls to clear Dino's lot approached his business."

LMPD Training Division commander Maj. Paul Humphrey said that based on the video it appears McAtee fired his gun first, but that they still have to "put all the piece of the investigation together."

Both Humphrey and Schroeder said there are other questions left to answer, such as why McAtee fired his gun, where police were at the time he fired, whether authorities found a gun on McAtee, and if he was shooting at law enforcement or other shooters.

The incident is currently being investigated by local and state authorities while the National Guard does a review of its own members.

Humphrey said authorities have yet to piece together the sequence of events that led to McAtee's death, as there is no audio of the incident and the officers involved haven't yet been interviewed. He said officers are normally interviewed a day or two after the incident so that they have time to seek legal counsel.

Schroeder assumed the position of chief of police on Monday after Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced that former Chief Steve Conrad would be fired ahead of his planned July 1 retirement. The move came after he said he discovered that none of the police officers involved in McAtee's death had their body cameras activated.

Both LMPD officers who were involved in the incident have been placed on administrative leave pending the investigation, Schroeder said Monday.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



steinphoto/iStockBy STACY CHEN, ABC News

(LOS ANGELES) -- Los Angeles Police Chief Michel Moore has apologized for "misspeaking" after making controversial remarks about the death of George Floyd at a press conference Monday night. But Moore was confronted by angry callers on a virtual meeting Tuesday meant to address tensions and repeatedly asked to resign.

Moore was addressing the violence and looting at the protests Monday night in Los Angeles when he said, "We didn't have protests last night, we had criminal acts, we didn't have people mourning the death of this man, George Floyd, we had people capitalizing it. His death is on their hands as much as it is those officers.'"

The final sentence, seemingly blaming protesters for the death of Floyd, which has sparked nationwide protests against police, generated immediate rebukes online.

Now calling his initial words offensive, Moore said in a statement that while looting is wrong it is a false comparison to murder and he deeply regrets and apologizes for his "characterization."

"Let me be clear: The police officers involved were responsible for the death of George Floyd," he added.

There were almost 700 arrests on Monday night, 70 which involved burglary or looting, according to the LAPD.

The comments came at a time when the nation is in anguish, reeling from another death of an unarmed black man in police custody.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti showed support for his police chief on Tuesday.

He responded to the controversy in a short statement on Twitter, writing, "The responsibility for George Floyd's death rests solely with the police officers involved. Chief Moore regrets the words he chose this evening and has clarified them."

Garcetti was asked about the comments at a evening briefing Tuesday.

"When I heard him say what he said, I know he did not mean that," Garcetti said. "That statement is a wrong statement. The officers who killed George Floyd are murderers. I am glad he quickly corrected it. If I believed for a moment that the chief believed that in his heart, he would no longer be the chief."

While some showed support for Moore online, many are calling for Moore's resignation.

Tuesday morning, after Moore's apology, the L.A. Police Commission held a Zoom meeting where callers from the community sharply criticized the LAPD's history of police brutality and called for Moore's immediate firing.

The meeting hit its 500 people cap within minutes and it has tens of thousands of views online.

A resident of Los Angeles said on the call, "The fact that was your unscripted instinct, we see who you are and if you the members of the police commission refuse to hold him accountable you deserve to be terminated from your positions as well, you need to police the police."

One caller after another expressed their anger and frustration directly at the chief and the commissioners, questioning the sincerity of their commitment to end racial injustice within the department.

In an impassioned speech, another caller said the department's responses were "hollow," adding, "We're not asking for too much, we simply want police to stop killing us and to be accountable when they do."

Los Angeles County was under curfew for a third day Tuesday.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



iluhanos/iStockBy MEREDITH DELISO, ABC News

(TALLAHASSEE, Fla.) -- LGBTQ advocates are calling for a full investigation and accountability into the shooting death of a black trans man by a police officer in Tallahassee, Florida, last week.

The Tallahassee Police Department said an officer was responding to a deadly stabbing incident on May 27 when they came across Tony McDade, who matched the description of the stabbing suspect, in the area. McDade allegedly pointed a gun at the officer, and the officer fatally shot him, Tallahassee Police Chief Lawrence Revell said in a press briefing following the shooting.

The death of McDade, 38, was the third fatal officer-involved shooting in the Florida capital in two months.

His death -- two days after George Floyd's while in police custody -- has sparked an outcry from advocacy groups.

"Justice cannot be served without accountability," Natishia June, the deputy field director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, said during a press briefing Monday calling for an independent investigation into his death. "The Tallahassee Police Department must be held accountable to Tony McDade's family and the community they are sworn to protect and serve."

Equality Florida Executive Director Nadine Smith told ABC News there's a pattern of police restraint against white suspects, and "zero when the person you're dealing with is black."

"The issue really comes down to this: Did the police seek to apprehend someone, or did they simply open fire because they concluded that Tony's life didn't matter?" she said.

McDade's death is believed to be at least the 12th violent death of a transgender or gender nonconforming person so far this year in the U.S., according to the Human Rights Campaign.

"The Human Rights Campaign and the entire transgender and non-binary community demand accountability and answers for Tony's death -- and countless violent deaths of trans people, black people and, disproportionately, black transgender people," Tori Cooper, HRC director of community engagement for the Transgender Justice Initiative, said in a statement. "Black people, LGBTQ people, and especially all LGBTQ people of color are at greater risk for violence every day in this country. This must end."

The National Black Justice Coalition called for a "full and complete investigation" following news of McDade's death.

"We don't know a lot of the details around Tony's death, or how police became involved. We do know that Tony should not have been killed," Executive Director David J. Johns said in a statement. "We must work together to raise awareness about the unique challenges that black LGBTQ/SGL people face. It is important to highlight the too-often ignored violence that members of our community face in addition to the discrimination we may experience because we are black."

One organization, Tallahassee Community Action Committee, is calling for Revell to resign. On Wednesday, it is hosting a protest demanding he be removed as chief of police.

The outcry comes amid protests over the death of Floyd, a black man who died on Memorial Day after he was pinned down by a white Minnesota police officer. Floyd's death, along with the recent police shooting death of Breonna Taylor in Louisville, has brought attention to the institutionalized racism faced by black people, June said.

"Tony McDade should still be alive. George Floyd should be alive. Breonna Taylor should still be alive," June said. "The list of black people who have been murdered by police is too long for people to ignore."

According to Equality Florida, the state is an "epicenter" of anti-trans violence, with seven black transgender women murdered over the last two years. On Wednesday, the organization is hosting a virtual town hall on racism and injustice against the LGBTQ community.

"This is a moment of accountability," Smith said. "And it is long overdue."

The Tallahassee Police Department is currently undergoing three investigations connected to this incident: the death of the stabbing victim, the death of McDade and the officer-involved shooting itself "to see if the officer committed a criminal act," Officer Kevin Bradshaw, spokesman for the Tallahassee Police Department, told ABC News.

Bradshaw said the department is still collecting and reviewing evidence, and likely no more details will be released until the investigation goes before the grand jury. The court proceedings may be delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic, he added.

The officer who shot and killed McDade has been placed on administrative leave during the investigation, the department said. The officer's name has not been released.

On Monday, the Florida Police Benevolent Association filed a motion to withhold the name of the officer under Florida's Marsy's Law, which protects the identity of victims, according to Tallahassee ABC affiliate WTXL-TV.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



amphotora/iStockBy BILL HUTCHINSON, ABC News

(ST. LOUIS) --  A retired St. Louis police captain who became a small-town police chief was found fatally shot early Tuesday outside a pawn shop that was looted after protests over the death of George Floyd turned violent.

David Dorn, 77, was discovered on the sidewalk in front of Lee's Pawn & Jewelry in St. Louis around 2:30 a.m., said Police Commissioner John Hayden. He said Dorn, who retired from the St. Louis Police Department in 2007 and had been serving as police chief of Moline Acres, Missouri, since 2008, was killed when he apparently tried to stop the looting of the shop.

"David Dorn was exercising law enforcement training that he learned here," Hayden said. No further details were immediately released.

His widow, Ann Marie Dorn, told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that her husband was a friend of the pawn shop's owner and frequently checked on the business when alarms went off.

The death came on a brutal night for police across the country.

A Las Vegas police officer on life support was last listed in critical condition after being shot Monday night attempting to disperse a large crowd of protesters outside a casino, authorities said.

An officer was attacked in New York City, and four cops were shot in St. Louis as demonstrations across the nation in the aftermath of George Floyd's death have turned increasingly violent for both protestors and police.

At least five deaths have occurred during the widespread unrest, according to The New York Times.

The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department officer was critically wounded engaging with violent protesters outside the Circus Circus Hotel & Casino on the famed Las Vegas Strip. Separately, police fatally shot a heavily armed man who appeared to be wearing body armor outside a federal courthouse nearby.

"This is a sad night for LVMPD family and a tragic night for our community," LVMPD Sheriff Joe Lombardo said at a news conference. "With these protests, which are leading to riots, one tragedy is only leading to another."

Lombardo said his officers were being pelted with rocks and bottles.

"Our officers were attempting to get some of the protesters in custody when a shot rang out and our officer went down," he added.

The wounded officer was taken to Las Vegas University Medical Center, where he was in "extremely critical condition."

A suspect was arrested by a SWAT team, but that person's name wasn't immediately released, Lombardo added.

While LVMPD officers were investigating the shooting, officers guarding the Foley Federal Building were confronted by an armed man around 11:22 p.m., Lombardo said. That suspect, who appeared to be wearing body armor, had multiple firearms.

"During the interaction, the subject reached for his firearm and our officers engaged him," Lombardo said. The suspect, who hasn't yet been identified, died at the hospital. It's unclear whether that individual had been among the protestors, Lombardo added.

The four officers wounded in St. Louis on Monday night were shot near police headquarters, where clashes with rioters lasted well into the night.

"They were standing near a line and all of a sudden they felt pain," Police Commissioner Hayden said during a news conference Tuesday morning. "They were just standing there. So some coward fired shots at officers, and now we have four in the hospital ... and thank God they're alive. Can we make some sense out of this? ... This is horrible."

The officers, ranging in age from 28 to 52, suffered non-life-threatening injuries. Before the shootings, demonstrators hurled rocks and fireworks at police, and some officers had gasoline dumped on them, Hayden added.

Meanwhile in New York City, video emerged that appeared to show an officer being attacked with a heavy object by a group of men in the Bronx. The New York Police Department said it made nearly 700 arrests Monday night as looting and vandalism targets included stores at Rockefeller Center and some in the Upper East Side. A curfew of 11 p.m. had been put in effect.

"We saw stuff last night that we will not accept. And we can fight back, and we will fight back," Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a news conference on Tuesday. "I have confidence in the people of New York City, I have confidence in the leaders in communities, I have confidence in the NYPD."

"There's a lot of people trying to express fear, a lot of people trying to tear down, a lot of people say they don't believe in the people of this city, they don't believe in people in our communities, they don't believe in our police officers. To hell with all of them. I don't care if they're left or right or center -- I am sick of people attacking New York City," he continued.

Floyd died May 25 in Minneapolis. His final moments were captured in a searing video of a white officer with his knee on Floyd's black neck as he pleaded for his life. "I can't breathe," Floyd said.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



Mostafa Bassim/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesBy JON HAWORTH, EMILY SHAPIRO and IVAN PEREIRA, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- The death of George Floyd, a black man who died on Memorial Day after he was pinned down by a white Minnesota police officer, has sparked outrage and protests in Minneapolis and across the United States.

Murder and manslaughter charges have been filed against Derek Chauvin, the officer who prosecutors say held his knee on Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes.

Chauvin and the other three officers at the scene have been fired. The Department of Justice is investigating.

Here is how the news unfolded on Tuesday. All times Eastern:

10:39 p.m.: Trump objects to GOP criticism of church photo op

President Donald Trump lashed out at fellow Republicans who have criticized his decision to clear protesters out of Lafayette Park Monday evening prior to a photo op in front of St. John's Episcopal Church.

He called out Sens. Susan Collins of Maine, James Lankford of Oklahoma and Ben Sasse of Nebraska, who were all critical of the violent removal of peaceful protesters with flashbangs and smoke canisters.

"You got it wrong! If the protesters were so peaceful, why did they light the Church on fire the night before?" he tweeted, though it was a different group of protesters and Monday's group had not been violent. "People liked my walk to this historic place of worship! Sen. Susan Collins, Sen. James Lankford, Sen. Ben Sasse."

8:58 p.m.: Police close Soho to New York Protesters

Police blocked streets in Soho just after New York's 8 p.m. curfew started.

Several boutique stores in the expensive Manhattan neighborhood were damaged by protesters over the weekend. Sidewalks were taped off and barricades were placed in the street preventing anyone from entering.

Even though the curfew banned nonessential workers from being outside, some protesters continued to march throughout the city.

8:00 p.m.: Boston protesters hold die-in at Franklin Park

Thousands of protesters rallied peacefully in Boston with a massive "die-in" demonstration in Franklin Park.

The crowds laid on the ground for eight minutes and 46 seconds, the exact time former officer Derek Chauvin placed his knee on George Floyd's neck.

The protesters stayed in the park for at least two hours.

"The peaceful protest at Franklin Park has come to a conclusion. As participants vacate the area, we respectfully remind individuals to remain committed to peace," the Boston police said.

7:10 p.m.: DC protests rally behind gate near White House

As Washington, D.C., approached its 7 p.m. curfew, thousands of protesters once again gathered outside the White House.

A chain-link fence was set up just outside the section where officers fired flash bang grenades and tear gas into the crowd 24 hours earlier. The crowd shouted at police officers on the other side but remained peaceful, with some taking a knee.

When some protesters climbed street lights, others in the crowd screamed for them to climb down.

National Guard troops were still deployed in the city, including a group that was lined up on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

7:05 p.m.: Minneapolis school board votes to cut ties with police


In a unanimous decision, Minneapolis school board members voted Tuesday night to terminate its contract with the Minneapolis Police Department following its actions in Floyd's death.

The school superintendent's office will devise an alternative plan to serve its students, according to the board.

6:47 p.m.: Dr. Birx calls on mayors to test all protesters for coronavirus


Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coordinator for its coronavirus task force, said during a video appearance at The German Marshall Fund's Brussels Forum that she worries about the spread of COVID among protesters around the country.

Birx said she is particularly concerned with footage that shows many of the protesters not wearing face coverings and with the possible spread to elderly persons.

"And so we're really trying to do the work with mayors to expand testing availability over the next week or two so that the individuals who were involved in the peaceful protest can get tested," she said.

7:10 p.m.: DC protests rally behind gate near White House

As Washington, D.C., approached its 7 p.m. curfew, thousands of protesters once again gathered outside the White House.

A chain-link fence was set up just outside the section where officers fired flash bang grenades and tear gas into the crowd 24 hours earlier. The crowd shouted at police officers on the other side but remained peaceful, with some taking a knee.

When some protesters climbed street lights, others in the crowd screamed for them to climb down.

National Guard troops were still deployed in the city, including a group that was lined up on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

7:05 p.m.: Minneapolis school board votes to cut ties with police


In a unanimous decision, Minneapolis school board members voted Tuesday night to terminate its contract with the Minneapolis Police Department following its actions in Floyd's death.

The school superintendent's office will devise an alternative plan to serve its students, according to the board.

6:47 p.m.: Dr. Birx calls on mayors to test all protesters for coronavirus


Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coordinator for its coronavirus task force, said during a video appearance at The German Marshall Fund's Brussels Forum that she worries about the spread of COVID among protesters around the country.

Birx said she is particularly concerned with footage that shows many of the protesters not wearing face coverings and with the possible spread to elderly persons.

"And so we're really trying to do the work with mayors to expand testing availability over the next week or two so that the individuals who were involved in the peaceful protest can get tested," she said.

6:38 p.m.: New York protesters take knee outside mayor's mansion


Hundreds of protesters in Manhattan marched to Gracie Mansion, Mayor Bill de Blasio's residence, and took a knee.

The protest was largely peaceful and there were even volunteers giving out face masks and hand sanitizer. Afterward, the crowd made its way to Central Park, according to eyewitnesses.

New York's curfew is slated to go into effect at 8 p.m.

6:12 p.m.: George Floyd's daughter, girl's mother make 1st public appearance


Gianna Floyd, the 6-year-old daughter of George Floyd, and her mother, Roxie Washington, made their first public appearance since his death at a news conference Minneapolis City Hall.

Washington held back tears as she talked about Floyd and lamented that their child won't grow up with him in her life.

"If there's a problem and she needs her dad, she does not have that anymore," she said.

Floyd moved from Houston to Minneapolis for better job opportunities and to provide for his family, Washington said.

"I want justice for him. Because he was good," she said.

"And this is the proof that he was a good man," Washington said, referring to Gianna.

5:47 p.m.: Denver cop fired over social media post

The Denver Police Department said it has fired an officer and begun an internal affairs investigation after he posted an inappropriate photo on social media while policing the city's protests.

Officer Thomas McClay posted a picture of himself and two other officers in riot gear with the caption, "Let's start a riot," on Instagram, according to the department. The post was taken down, however, police officials said it violated the department's social media policy and was "inconsistent with the values of the department." 



5:27 p.m.: Florida police place cop who put knee on back of black suspect on leave

The Sarasota, Florida, Police Department said an officer who was videotaped putting their knee on a black suspect during an arrest last month has been placed on administrative leave pending an investigation.

A video of the unnamed officer putting their knee on Patrick Qwashawn Carroll's neck was put on social media Monday and tagged the department. Police Chief Bernadette DiPino reviewed the video and other footage of the May 18 arrest, immediately initiated a formal internal affairs investigation and placed the officer on administrative leave, according to the department.

"Chief DiPino was disturbed to see an Officer kneeling on the head and neck of an individual in the video. While it appears the Officer eventually moves his leg to the individual's back, this tactic is not taught, used or advocated by our agency," the department said in a statement.

According to the Sarasota Police Department, Carroll, 27, did not require medical attention and did not complain of injuries. He was later charged with possession of ammunition by a convicted felon, resisting arrest and domestic violence

The police are asking anyone who had more information or footage of the arrest to contact them.

Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin placed his knee on George Floyd's neck before he died.

4 p.m.: French protesters set fires, clash with police

Demonstrations in support of George Floyd are ongoing overseas, including in the French cities of Paris and Lyon.

Protesters there are setting fires and clashing with police officers, who are responding with tear gas.

The French are not only showing solidarity with George Floyd, but also the family of a French black man who died after being arrested by police in 2016.

3:22 p.m.: Minnesota Dept. of Human Rights to investigate police department

Minnesota's Department of Human Rights is launching an investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department after filing a civil rights charge related to Floyd's death, Gov. Tim Walz announced Tuesday.

The investigation will examine the "policies, procedures, and practices over the past 10 years" to determine if the police department "has engaged in systemic discriminatory practices towards people of color," a statement said.

If so, the investigation will work to "ensure any such practices are stopped," the statement said.

Walz called this investigation "only one of many steps to come in our effort to restore trust with those in the community who have been unseen and unheard for far too long."

As protests spread across the Twin Cities, about 123 people were arrested Monday and early Tuesday, mostly for curfew violations, authorities said. About 13 guns were seized, police said.

A total of 604 people have been arrested since Friday, according to the Minnesota State Patrol, and dozens of fires have been reported in the last several days.

2 p.m.: Floyd Mayweather to pay for George Floyd's funeral

George Floyd's family has accepted an offer from boxer Floyd Mayweather to pay for his funeral, Leonard Ellerbe, the CEO of Mayweather Promotions, told ABC News.

Floyd, who is from Houston, will be laid to rest there on June 9.

His family plans to march with protesters to Houston's City Hall Tuesday afternoon.

1:40 p.m.: NY trooper pushing back demonstrators gets hit by speeding SUV

A 19-year veteran trooper of the New York State Police was pushing back a crowd of demonstrators in Buffalo on Monday night when he was hit by a speeding SUV, authorities said.

A Buffalo police officer was also hit by the car and a second trooper was run over.

Troopers fired at the SUV, state police said, and then the driver and passengers were taken into custody.

The veteran trooper was taken to the hospital with a shattered pelvis and broken leg, state police said. The other officers suffered minor injuries.

Those in the SUV were not seriously hurt.

1 p.m.: Surveillance video released from fatal police shooting in Louisville

Authorities on Tuesday released surveillance video from an incident which caused the death of David McAtee, a black man shot by officers in Louisville, Kentucky, during protests.

McAtee owned a local BBQ restaurant which was frequented by police officers, Mayor Greg Fischer said.

At about 12:15 a.m. Monday, members of the Louisville police and Kentucky National Guard were trying to disperse a crowd when they "were fired upon," Gov. Andy Beshear said. The local police and National Guard returned fire, "resulting in a death," Beshear said.

Video footage from McAtee's restaurant and a neighboring business appeared to show officers approaching McAtee's business, police said Tuesday.

McAtee then appeared to fire a gun outside his restaurant, toward the officers, police said. Officers took cover and returned fire, police said.

From the footage it appears McAtee fired first, police said.

Authorities cautioned Tuesday that the video does not provide all of the answers.

Why officers were approaching McAtee's restaurant in the first place is under investigation, police said.

The officers have not yet been interviewed, police said.

Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad has since been fired after it was announced that no body camera footage was available of the shooting, The Louisville Courier Journal reported.

Conrad previously said he would retire at the end of June after facing immense pressure following the March death of Breonna Taylor, a young black woman who was shot dead by police while in her home.

The Kentucky State Police will independently investigate McAtee's death, the governor said Monday.

12:15 p.m.: Despite overnight looting, Chicago to move into next phase of reopening

Amid overnight looting, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot promised Tuesday, "we are 110% dedicated to you successfully reopening safely and securely."

Lightfoot said she was with one business owner who "burst into tears" and "broke down" as she looked at the devastation to her store.

Despite the unrest, Lightfoot said Chicago will move into phase 3 of its coronavirus reopening on Wednesday.

"We want economic activity to resume peacefully and safely in every single neighborhood, especially those hurting the most," Lightfoot said.

11:12 a.m.: Nearly 700 arrested in NYC, curfew extended through the week

In New York City, despite an 11 p.m. curfew, nearly 700 people were arrested overnight as peaceful protests devolved into moments of vandalism, looting, fire and confrontation.

Luxury brands and big box retail stores in Rockefeller Center and the Upper East Side had windows smashed and spray painted. Many retailers have boarded up their storefronts.

Some officers were hit by cars of protesters fleeing the scenes of vandalism and looting.

It also appeared officers were shot at, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said, condemning it as "unacceptable."

"I know people want peace," de Blasio stressed Tuesday, "and I know the want change."

"I know we will overcome this," he said, adding he's asked community leaders to "step forward" and "take charge."

"Do not let outsiders attack your community ...do not let criminals attack your community," the mayor said. "I'll be standing by you."

New York City will now be under a nine-hour curfew each night this week, beginning at 8 p.m. and ending at 5 a.m.

The mayor on Tuesday asked those who want to protest to do so during the day, and then return home.

He also said he's very worried that protests are leading to the spread of the coronavirus.

10:40 a.m.: Senate Judiciary to hold hearing on George Floyd's death, policing in US

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham said he's planning to hold a hearing on June 16 to examine Floyd's death and policing in the country, promising to "take a deep dive" into the issue.

"It's a long-overdue wake-up call to the country that there are too many of these cases where African American men die in police custody under fairly brutal circumstances," he said. "It's clear to me that policing among men in the African American community is a topic that needs to be discussed and acted upon, and I expect this committee to do its part."

"I'd like to get to the root cause of it. Mr. Floyd's case is outrageous on its face, but I think it speaks to a broader issue," said Graham, R-S.C. "We just need to get to the bottom of what happened and what we can do to fix it."

Graham called community policing "the anecdote."

"I don't know how to make that a reality, but we'll have a hearing along those lines," Graham said.

9 a.m.: More than 500 arrested overnight in NYC

In New York City, despite an 11 p.m. curfew, more than 500 people were arrested overnight as peaceful protests devolved into moments of vandalism, looting, fire and confrontation.

Luxury brands and big box retail stores in Rockefeller Center and the Upper East Side had windows smashed and spray painted. Many retailers have boarded up their storefronts.

Several officers were hit by cars of protesters fleeing the scenes of vandalism and looting.

7:35 a.m.: Minnesota Attorney General says he is considering all charges for Derek Chauvin, including first degree murder

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison confirmed he is "considering all charges" and that "all options are on the table," when it comes to prosecuting Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd.

Speaking to ABC News' Good Morning America, Ellison, who has taken over the prosecution in Floyd's death, warned that the case must be dealt with methodically and that prosecuting Chauvin would not necessarily be easy.

"Generally, jurors resolve all doubts in favor of the police," said Ellison. "The system is such that there are certain immunities police have, there are certain presumptions. There are relationships that police have that are established over the course of years. And the fact is if you just look at the Freddie Gray case, people looked at that video and were quite certain that there needed to be a conviction. No one was."

"The fact is these cases are not easy," said Ellison. "And anybody who says they are has never done one."

Ellison was reluctant to give a firm deadline on the timeline of the case but confirmed that the public could see charges very soon.

"We are having a fresh review from what the county attorney has already done ... and we are looking at this case with fresh eyes," said Ellison. "There is nobody who has culpability who will not be held accountable."

Said Ellison: "The public has an expectation that there will be, there will render assistance when necessary, that [police] will not add harm. Just saying 'I didn't know' and 'I was following orders', I don't think is working for the public anymore. That is not a comment about the evidence or the law. It is a comment about where the public's mind is these days."

Ellison said that he and his team are moving "expeditiously" but warned that they also have to move carefully which could take more time than the public would like.

"There are numerous videos, numerous witness statements, a lot of stuff to go through for us to do due diligence," Ellison stated. "We are not going to prolong this any longer than is absolutely necessary to do that due diligence and we are moving expeditiously, yet we have to move carefully. I know that is unsatisfying to people. They want, what they want immediately, and of course people have waited too long and have been too patient over the years but this case must be done methodically and we are doing that right now."

6:49 a.m.: Las Vegas police officer in critical condition and on life support

Las Vegas Sheriff Joe Lombardo held a brief press conference to update the public on the two shooting incidents that took place amid protests happening across the city last night.

In the first incident, an officer was engaging with protesters near the Circus Circus hotel and casino and was shot.

"Our officers were attempting to take rocks and bottles from the crowd," said Lombardo during the press conference. "Officers were attempting to get some of the protesters in custody when a shot rang out and our officer went down."

The suspect in that shooting has been taken into custody but Lombardo said the police officer who was shot is in "extremely critical condition and on life support currently."

The second incident occurred at the courthouse on South Las Vegas Boulevard when officers who were posted at the federal building to protect it from protesters encountered a suspect at approximately 11:22 p.m. armed with multiple weapons and appeared to be wearing body armor.

When authorities approached the individual, the suspect reached for one of those weapons and was subsequently shot by the responding officers.

The suspect later died at the hospital.

"This is a tragic night for our community," said Lombardo. "With these protests, which are leading to riots, one tragedy is only leading to another ... our investigations into both these incidents will be ongoing throughout the morning."

"What has occurred is utterly, utterly unacceptable and I hope the community sees it that way too," he concluded.

5:43 a.m.: Peaceful protests in New York City devolve into night of looting

Peaceful protests over the death of George Floyd devolved Monday night into jarring moments of vandalism, looting, fire and confrontation in New York.

There were more than 200 arrests and widespread vandalism in Midtown Manhattan and along Fordham Road and the Grand Concourse in the Bronx, much of which went down after the citywide 11 p.m. curfew.

Luxury brands and big box retail stores in Rockefeller Center and the Upper East Side had windows smashed and spray painted. Many more retailers boarded up their storefronts, giving the heart of a vibrant city already shuttered for the virus the look of blight.

There were also several reports of officers being hit by vehicles of protesters fleeing the scenes of vandalism and looting.

4:14 a.m.: Two police officers shot in Las Vegas in separate incidents

Two police officers have been shot in separate incidents in Las Vegas as people protest the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, authorities said.

One officer was shot near the 300 block of South Las Vegas Boulevard and the other officer was shot about two miles away in the 2800 block of South Las Vegas Boulevard.

The condition of the two officers is currently unknown. Police have said the scene is active and have asked the public to avoid the areas.

3:22 a.m.: Four police officers shot in St. Louis on a night of violent protests

St. Louis Police Chief Hayden John Hayden held a press conference regarding four officers that were shot amid protests last night.

He confirmed that all four officers have non life threatening injuries. Two were shot in the leg, one was shot in the foot and the other was shot in the arm.

Police Chief Hayden said that a peaceful protest began around 3 p.m. with a couple of thousand people in attendance but that sometime later a group of about 200 people started looting.

The group reportedly ignited fireworks and set them off aiming at the officers. Hayden also said the officers, who he said exhibited restraint throughout the entire ordeal, also had gas thrown on them.

That is when, he said, several officers, who were standing on the line, all of a sudden felt pain and realized that they had been fired upon with four of them being hit, according to Hayden.

The Police Chief also confirmed that there are still reports of gunshots being fired in the city that they're trying to get under control.

The officers were taken to hospital and treated for their wounds. The investigation into who shot them is ongoing.

1:57 a.m.: LAPD Chief apologizes for equating looters with officers involved in Floyd's death

Los Angeles Police Department Chief Michel Moore apologized for a remark he made during a mayor's press conference Monday afternoon where he said: "We didn't have people mourning the death of this man, George Floyd, we had people capitalizing. His death is on their hands as much as it is those officers ... We didn't have protests last night. We had criminal acts."

The comment was met with immediate backlash and Black Lives Matter LA called for Moore to be fired in a tweet.

Several hours later, Police Chief Moore, amid much criticism, issued an apology on Twitter saying that he misspoke during the press conference.

12:44 a.m.: Protests mostly peaceful in NYC, Denver, Louisville

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted late Monday night that any unrest has calmed down at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, the site of clashes between protesters and police over the last few days.

De Blasio said protesters were overwhelmingly peaceful on this latest night of demonstrations, but that some people during the evening caused some damage that won't be allowed.

In Denver, protesters at the State Capitol took a knee and observed eight minutes and 46 seconds of silence -- the same amount of time Derek Chauvin had his knee on George Floyd’s neck before Floyd died. Only the sound of helicopters above and honking in the distance could be heard.

Louisville, Kentucky, Mayor Greg Fischer also said protests in his city were largely peaceful.

The mayor said the peaceful demonstrations honored the memory of David McAtee, the local restaurant owner who was shot and killed by Louisville police officers early Monday morning.

12:27 a.m.: Streets quiet in nation's capital

The city of Washington, D.C., has been relatively quiet tonight compared to the violence of the past weekend, law enforcement and homeland security officials tell ABC News.

Officials report sporadic disturbances in Chinatown, where tear gas was deployed near the Convention Center.

City and federal law enforcement, as well as the military, has had a heavy presence on the city streets, with aircraft, including a Black Hawk helicopter, patrolling overhead.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



narvikk/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR and MEREDITH DELISO, ABC News

(NEW YORK) -- A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 380,000 people worldwide.

Over 6.3 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations' outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 1.8 million diagnosed cases and at least 106,181 deaths.

Here's how the news developed on Tuesday. All times Eastern:

9:45 p.m.: Trump promises to move GOP convention

In a series of tweets, President Donald Trump says the Republican National Convention will no longer be held in North Carolina and the GOP is hunting for a new host state.

Earlier today, Gov. Roy Cooper denied the RNC's request for a "full convention" given the ongoing coronavirus health crisis. He asked for social distancing, smaller crowds and facial coverings, among other protections.

The president tweeted, in part, "Had long planned to have the Republican National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, a place I love. Now, @NC_Governor Roy Cooper and his representatives refuse to guarantee that we can have use of the Spectrum Arena. ... Governor Cooper is still in Shelter-In-Place Mode, and not allowing us to occupy the arena as originally anticipated and promised. Would have showcased beautiful North Carolina to the World, and brought in hundreds of millions of dollars, and jobs, for the State."

Cooper responded to the president saying the party is looking elsewhere for a convention, writing in a tweet, "We have been committed to a safe RNC convention in North Carolina and it’s unfortunate they never agreed to scale down and make changes to keep people safe. Protecting public health and safety during this pandemic is a priority."

Vice President Mike Pence has previously said Texas, Florida and Georgia were alternatives.

5:50 p.m.: USDA confirms 1st case of COVID-19 in pet dog

The first pet dog has tested positive for COVID-19 in the U.S., the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Tuesday.

The dog, a German shepherd in New York state, was tested at a private veterinary laboratory after showing signs of respiratory illness. Subsequent testing by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories confirmed the case, the USDA said.

The dog is expected to make a full recovery. One of its owners had also tested positive for COVID-19, and another dog in the household had tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies, suggesting exposure, the USDA said.

The first suspected case of COVID-19 in a pet dog in the U.S. -- a pug named Winston in North Carolina -- was later found to be inconclusive.

The USDA has also confirmed cases of COVID-19 in two pet cats in New York, as well as tigers and lions at the Bronx Zoo.

4:05 p.m.: NIH director says physical distancing 'best weapon' during summer


It's still unclear how warmer weather will impact the novel coronavirus. But one study has the director of the National Institutes of Health advising people to still practice social distancing during the summer.

In a blog post Tuesday, Dr. Francis Collins looked at the "sobering predictions" of a study by the Princeton Environmental Institute recently published in the journal Science.

"This research team found that humans' current lack of immunity to SARS-CoV-2 -- not the weather -- will likely be a primary factor driving the continued, rapid spread of the novel coronavirus this summer and into the fall," Collins wrote.

Based on the study, climate will only become a seasonal factor once a large number of people in a community are immune, he added.

There is one "glimmer of hope," according to Collins: One of the team's models found that physical distancing, along with warm temperatures, "actually might combine well to help slow the spread of this devastating virus," he wrote.

"It's a reminder that physical distancing will remain our best weapon into the summer to slow or prevent the spread of COVID-19," he added.

3:37 p.m.: Army experts say vaccine likely by end of the year


Army medical experts said it is possible a safe COVID-19 vaccine will be available by the end of the year.

"I think it is reasonable to expect that there will be some form of a vaccine that could be available at some level, to a certain population, by the end of the year, the first of the year," Col. Wendy Sammons-Jackson, director of the Military Infectious Disease Research Program at the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command, said at a press briefing Tuesday.

Vaccine development normally takes several years. The accelerated time frame is due to funding and focused efforts, the experts said.

"We're learning about the science of this new virus faster than we have about any other virus before," Dr. Kayvon Modjarrad, director of the Emerging Infectious Diseases Branch at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, said. "So, going to a vaccine in a matter of months from concept all the way to phase-three clinical trials, and potentially licensure, is unprecedented. But in this case, I think very much is possible."

The Army is working on its own vaccine, though the experts are not expecting that particular vaccine to be available this year. It is set to begin human trials late this summer.

8:35 a.m.: Wuhan tests nearly 10 million residents in citywide campaign

The Chinese city of Wuhan, ground zero of the coronavirus pandemic, has conducted nucleic acid tests for COVID-19 on 9,899,828 people between May 14 and June 1, officials said at a press conference on Tuesday.

No confirmed cases were detected in the process of the citywide screening; however, 300 asymptomatic cases were identified and quarantined, according to Lu Zuxun, a public health expert from Wuhan's Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Asymptomatic cases are not included in China's tally of confirmed cases.

All those who came in close contact with the asymptomatic cases have tested negative for COVID-19, Lu said.

Last month, the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission launched the citywide campaign to test the entire population of 11 million residents for COVID-19 in an effort to search for asymptomatic carriers of the virus after a cluster of new cases emerged for the first time since the city had lifted its strict lockdown on April 8. Although recommended, participation in the testing campaign was voluntary. Residents who were previously tested did not need to take part. It was not recommended to test children under the age of 6, according to the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission's website.

The tests were provided free of charge, and Wuhan's deputy mayor Hu Yabo said the city spent some $126 million on the screening. He told reporters it was "totally worthwhile."

The citywide campaign brought the total number of COVID-19 tests conducted in Wuhan since the start of the pandemic to 10.9 million, according to Chinese epidemiologist Li Lanjuan.

"Wuhan is now safe," Li told reporters Tuesday, "and Wuhan people are safe."

6:49 a.m.: France lifts more coronavirus restrictions

France began its second phase of easing coronavirus restrictions on Tuesday after two months of lockdown, symbolizing the return to what the prime minister called "an almost normal life."

Cafes and restaurants are allowed to reopen in the country's so-called green zones, areas where the novel coronavirus is deemed least actively circulating. Parks, gardens and restaurants terraces only can reopen in Paris, now an orange zone, as inside dining rooms must remain closed. France no longer has any red zones, which denoted areas where the virus was actively circulating.

Some Parisians were seen rushing to restaurant terraces as soon as midnight struck.

Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo has released a list of streets that can be closed to traffic to allow bars, cafes and restaurants to expand their seating outdoors.

"In this crisis, Paris needs to support its restaurants and bars," Hidalgo told French daily newspaper Le Parisien on Sunday. "They are the heart of our city."

Most schools have now reopened across the country. Movement restrictions have been lifted, with residents permitted to travel 60 miles beyond their homes again. Museums and monuments have also started to reopen from Tuesday.

France began the initial easing of lockdown measures on May 11. The European nation has reported more than 189,000 diagnosed cases of COVID-19 with at least 28,836 deaths, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.

6:07 a.m.: Russia reports under 9,000 new cases

Russia's coronavirus headquarters said Tuesday it had registered 8,863 new cases of COVID-19 and 182 deaths in the last 24 hours.

The country's tally now stands at 423,741 diagnosed cases with 5,037 deaths. Moscow, the capital, is the hardest-hit city in the country, accounting for about half of all infections.

The latest daily caseload is down from a peak of 11,656 new infections reported on May 11, during which Russia registered over 10,000 new cases per day over a 12-day period. Since then, the daily number of new infections has hovered around 9,000.

Russia has the third-highest number of cases in the world, behind Brazil and the United States, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.

5:30 a.m.: Africa’s coronavirus cases surpass 150,000

More than 150,000 people have now been diagnosed with COVID-19 in Africa and over 4,300 of them have died, according to a count kept by the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

All 54 African nations have reported COVID-19 cases and around half have detected community transmission of the virus, concentrated mainly in major cities. South Africa has, by far, the highest number of diagnosed cases -- more than 34,000 -- while Egypt has the largest death toll -- over 1,000, according to the Africa CDC.

However, the World Health Organization says Africa remains the least-affected region globally in terms of the number of reported cases and fatalities. The continent of 1.3 billion people has just 1.5% of the world's reported cases and less than 0.1% of the world's deaths.

"Of course, these numbers don’t paint the full picture," WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a press briefing in Geneva last week. "Testing capacity in Africa is still being ramped up and there is a likelihood that some cases may be missed."

"But even so, Africa appears to have so far been spared the scale of outbreaks we have seen in other regions," he added. "Africa’s knowledge and experience of suppressing infectious diseases has been critical to rapidly scaling up an agile response to COVID-19."

3:45 a.m.: US reports over 21,000 new cases amid mass protests

More than 21,000 people were diagnosed with COVID-19 across the United States on Monday, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.

The new cases were identified in all 50 states as well as Washington, D.C. and U.S. territories.

By May 20, all states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus.

The slight uptick in infections come as mass protests take place from coast to coast in the wake of the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died on May 25 in Minneapolis shortly after a white police officer was filmed kneeling on his neck for nearly nine minutes as three other officers stood by.

The Minneapolis Police Department has since fired all four officers, and the one seen pinning Floyd down, Derek Chauvin, has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. However, protesters are calling for the three other officers to be charged and are decrying the overall treatment of black Americans by police.

From May 25 through May 27, the United States reported a daily average of around 18,600 new cases of COVID-19. That number has increased to a daily average of around 22,500 new cases from May 28 through June 1, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

The number of people who have taken to the streets in the days since Floyd's death has been in the thousands, although many have been seen wearing face masks.

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



Sergio Flores/Getty ImagesBy KELLY MCCARTHY, ABC NEWS

(HOUSTON) -- As family and friends of George Floyd flooded the streets of his hometown in Houston, Texas on Tuesday to spread a message of hope, the mother of his young daughter addressed the public for the first time since his death.

Although 6-year-old Gianna Floyd did not speak, her mother, Roxie Washington, and their attorney, Chris Stewart, talked about the impact that her father's death has had on the family and the community.

Floyd died on Memorial Day after a Minneapolis police officer arrested him and pushed his knee against his neck.

As Washington wiped away tears standing at the podium in Minneapolis City Hall Tuesday, she explained how much Floyd loved his daughter, and lamented over the fact he would not be there for the big moments in her life.

"If there's a problem and she needs her dad, she does not have that anymore," Washington said at the press conference. "I want justice for him. Because he was good -- and this is the proof that he was a good man," she added, referring to his daughter.

During a question and answer session, Washington was moved to tears and said, "He loved her so much."

She also said Floyd went to Minneapolis to find new work opportunities and take care of providing for his family.

"He still took care of us. He provided for us. He lived and he worked," she said. "He was a good man and father."

Stephen Jackson, a retired NBA player and close friend of Floyd, vowed to stand with his family until they get justice. He also promised Washington that he will be there to walk her daughter down the aisle one day, in honor of his friend.

In Houston, over 60,000 people stood in solidarity, taking strides across George Floyd's former city on Tuesday to honor his memory.

"We want justice for Floyd and i'm a black mother and I heard his cry and it hurt me to my heart," Sonia Parker, a marcher told ABC News Houston station KTRK. "We want peace and justice, that's it."

Ryan Moreno, another marcher, told ABC News' Marcus Moore, "I just feel like something powerful [is] going on right now. I feel like something should've been done a long time ago."

Local rappers Bun B and Trae Tha Truth -- a longtime friend of Floyd -- helped organize the event that was also supported by city officials Tuesday.

"It's a beautiful moment we're making George proud, this is George's family here, we're making them proud to show how many people loved George," Truth told ABC News while marching through the street.

Terrence Floyd visited the makeshift memorial in Minneapolis one day earlier at the spot where his older brother took his last breath and made a plea for peace.

"Keep my brother's name ringing," he told the crowd Monday. "We're still gonna do this peacefully," he vowed.

Floyd was seen in his final moments on a bystander's now-viral cellphone video that showed former police officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on his neck, while Floyd repeatedly stated, "I can't breathe." Those words have become an anthem for the Black Lives Matter movement.

The former security guard was a child of Houston's third ward, where a new mural of Floyd now reads, "Forever breathing in our hearts."

Floyd's second grade teacher Dr. Waynel Sexton told KTRK that she dug up some of his old school work from Black History Month that could serve as an important message today.

Sexton said that Floyd wrote that he wanted to be a Supreme Court Justice in a drawing of a judge and a jury.

"We have to teach our children now how to approach a police officer," the veteran teacher said. "I know many police officers are good men, but we have to do better."

Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.



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