banner banner
Infinite Menus, Copyright 2006, OpenCube Inc. All Rights Reserved.
South Jersey's News Talk Leader!
Radio You Can Depend On!
ABC National

Subscribe To This Feed

WPLG/ABC News(TAMARAC, Fla.) -- A trapper in Florida sealed his rescue of an injured alligator with a kiss.

The 8-foot alligator was visibly injured and bleeding Sunday while resting on the median strip along a road in Tamarac, Florida, according to authorities.

“It appeared that maybe it was hit by a car, because it had some road rash from the nose up to its spine,” Broward Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Will Medina told ABC Miami affiliate WPLG-TV.

Enter a trapper whose job was to contain the reptile, an ordeal captured on cellphone video that lasted nine minutes.

Wrapping the gator’s mouth with duct tape, the trapper puckered up and delivered the reptile a kiss on its snout.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- ABC News has confirmed that the Trump administration has settled on a new appointment for U.S. Secret Service director.

Former Marine general and Acting Deputy Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection Randolph "Tex" Alles is the pick for the position, law enforcement and government sources tell ABC News.

Selecting an outsider would be a big shift for the insular agency, which has long promoted its leaders through the ranks.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/supparsorn(LITTLE ROCK, Ark.) -- Arkansas has executed Marcel Williams, 52, just after 10:30 PM local time on Monday. His was the second execution of the night, making this the first double execution in the country since 2000.

U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker had halted Williams' execution while his attorneys argued whether the night’s first execution had gone properly. Williams was sentenced to death for the 1994 rape and murder of 22-year-old Stacy Rae Errickson after kidnapping her at gunpoint from a gas station in Jacksonville, Arkansas.

The first executed inmate, Jack Jones, was declared dead at 7:20pm local time on Monday, at the state’s Cummins Unit. He was sentenced to death for the 1995 rape and murder of 34-year-old bookkeeper Mary Phillips in Bald Knob, Arkansas.

Arkansas had scheduled eight executions over an 11-day period before the end of April, when its supply of a lethal injection drug expires. One inmate was put to death last week, though the first three executions were canceled because of court rulings.

 Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Siskiyou County Sheriff(YREKA, Calif.) -- The former Tennessee teacher who authorities say kidnapped his 15-year-old student then allegedly spent over a month on the run with her had planned to flee to Mexico, federal prosecutors said.

Tad Cummins, 50, a married father and grandfather, went missing with 15-year-old Elizabeth Thomas on March 13, authorities said. An Amber Alert was issued for Elizabeth, while Cummins was wanted on allegations of aggravated kidnapping and sexual contact with a minor. The duo was found on April 20; the teen was "healthy and unharmed," authorities said, and Cummins was taken into custody.

Cummins allegedly plotted their getaway from the moment he was suspected of having an improper relationship with the teen, according to a motion filed by federal prosecutors Monday supporting detention for Cummins.

"The logical inference is that the defendant ... fled to avoid criminal charges," prosecutors said.

Prosecutors said Cummins planned to reach the Mexico border and then head to countries further south.

Cummins allegedly obtained a "small watercraft and conducted a test run to cross into Mexico across the water from San Diego," prosecutors said. "The defendant also considered the feasibility of a land crossing into Mexico."

Prosecutors claim that in an effort to evade capture, Cummins deliberately left a "misleading note with his wife regarding" which direction he was traveling. Cummins also allegedly altered his appearance, switched license plates twice, disabled the car's GPS system and used aliases for himself and the teenager, prosecutors said.

Cummins and Elizabeth were found on April 20 at a remote cabin in northern California near the Oregon border after over a month on the run.

Cummins was arrested on a state warrant for aggravated kidnapping and he faces a federal charge of transporting a minor in interstate commerce with the intent to engage in criminal sexual activity. He appeared in federal court in Sacramento, California, Monday, where he did not enter a plea. Cummins is expected to be extradited to Tennessee.

The teenager was found "healthy and unharmed," authorities said. She has returned to Tennessee and is in a "safe location with family and friends where she is comfortable and resting," said attorney Jason Whatley, who is representing the Thomas family.

Cummins, who was fired one day after the alleged kidnapping, had allegedly researched teen marriage online, specifically the age of consent, according to law enforcement officials.

One of Elizabeth's schoolmates reported seeing her and Cummins kiss in his classroom on Jan. 23, according to a school district investigative report, but both denied the claim. A school report from January reads that neither one "admitted to behaving inappropriately towards the other."

Elizabeth’s father, Anthony Thomas, told ABC News after Elizabeth was found, “She may not be exactly ... the person she was because there’s a lot of experiences she’s had."

"I'm not allowed to ask her about things that happened along the way right now," he said.

Elizabeth’s father said the family is instead keeping "things positive."

"I go in there and tell her how much I missed her, how much I love her and how much her dog missed her," Anthony Thomas said.

"I think she has the determination to really go somewhere in life," he said. "But right now she really needs a lot of help."

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW ORLEANS) -- New Orleans has become the latest place in the South to take down monuments or symbols to the Confederacy.

Workers early Monday dismantled a 35-foot granite obelisk, the Liberty Place monument, which honored whites who tried to defeat a racially integrated government installed in New Orleans after the Civil War. The city will also remove three statues to Confederate military officers in coming days.

"We will no longer allow the Confederacy to literally be put on a pedestal in the heart of our city," Mayor Mitch Landrieu vowed.

New Orleans' toppling of Confederate monuments is part of a trend that gained speed and momentum after a mass shooting at a historic black church in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015, when avowed white supremacist Dylann Roof murdered nine African Americans in a bible-study session.

In the aftermath of the massacre, calls came from both Republicans and Democrats in South Carolina to take down a Confederate battle flag that flew atop the statehouse in Charleston.

South Carolina's public grappling with symbols of its history sparked calls from activists and politicians around the country to take down Confederate flags and monuments in other places.

Southern Poverty Law Center, an advocacy and research organization focused on fighting bigotry and discrimination, published a survey in the wake of the Charleston shooting that found more than 1,503 symbols of the Confederacy in public spaces in the U.S., nearly all of them in the South.

The group asserted in its study that the symbols of the Confederacy can't be separated from the ideology underlying the Southern states' defense of slavery after the Civil War.

"There is no doubt among reputable historians that the Confederacy was established upon the premise of white supremacy and that the South fought the Civil War to preserve its slave labor," the study states.

South Carolina took the Confederate battle flag down from its perch on the statehouse on July 10, 2015, little more than three weeks after the church killings.

Since then, Confederate flags have also been taken down at other locations including the Alabama statehouse, Oklahoma Baptist University and St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Richmond, Virginia. Souvenir Confederate flags were also taken off the shelves at major retailers like Sears and Walmart and at small gift shops such as at the Civil War Museum of the Western Theater in Kentucky and at Antietam National Battlefield in Maryland.

Defenders of public displays of Confederate monuments and symbols say they are important markers of history.

Robert Bonner, a 63-year-old who participates in Civil War re-enactments, protested the removal of the Liberty Place monument in New Orleans, telling The Associated Press that the city's decision to take it down was "terrible."

"It's a terrible thing," Bonner said. "When you start removing the history of the city ... you start losing where you came from and where you've been."

Aware of opposition to removing the Liberty Place monument, the workers who took it down did so while it was still dark and wore both masks and bulletproof vests.

Some historians, echoing the view of the Southern Poverty Law Center, say many of the monuments to the Confederacy were put up less to commemorate history than to make a statement after the Civil War against any granting of full rights and political power to former slaves.

"Many of these statues were mounted in the 1890s and during the time of Jim Crow," when laws enforcing racial separation took hold, said Matt Karp, associate professor of history at Princeton University and author of a book on the legacy of slavery.

"These were political [statements] and not meant to be viewed as neutral symbols" of history, Karp said.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

ABC News(CHICAGO) -- The doctor who was dragged off a United flight by Chicago Department of Aviation security officers earlier this month is preparing for legal action over the incident, his lawyer told ABC News.

When asked by ABC News' Linsey Davis in an interview on Monday if Dr. Dao is planning legal action, attorney Thomas Demetrio said they are "getting ready."

United told ABC News that it had offered passengers on the plane up to $800 to give up their seats for four crew members who needed to board. No one volunteered, so the airline generated a list of four names to be removed from the flight and re-accommodated, per by the airline's contract of carriage. Three of those people complied, and one did not. That's when the police were called to remove the man, later identified as Dao.

United CEO Oscar Munoz apologized for the incident and has vowed that the company will conduct a “thorough review” of the “truly horrific event.”

Dao is still receiving treatment after suffering injuries in the April 9 incident, according to his lawyer.

Demetrio added that he has received hundreds of emails from passengers about their experiences on flights after taking up the Kentucky doctor's case.

Dao's lawyer is also representing an American Airlines passenger who is at the center of another viral video posted to Facebook on Friday. The footage shows an intense confrontation between a flight attendant and at least two passengers after a woman tried to bring her double-wide stroller on board a plane.

The airline’s rules for passengers traveling with children say strollers should be checked at the gate.

American Airlines responded to the incident shortly after the video began to circulate online, announcing in a statement that the flight attendant had been put on leave while the incident was investigated and that the woman and her family were upgraded to first class for the remainder of their international trip.

"What we see on this video does not reflect our values or how we care for our customers," American Airlines added in its statement. "We are deeply sorry for the pain we have caused this passenger and her family and to any other customers affected by the incident."

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

WFAA-TV(DALLAS) -- Two people are dead in what is believed to be a murder-suicide at an office building in Dallas, Texas, police said.

At approximately 10:45 a.m. local time, officers with the Dallas Police Department responded to reports of an active shooter at the office building in question, police said. There, officers found two deceased individuals, one male and one female, in a meeting room. The individuals have not yet been identified.

According to police, it is believed that the male shot the female and then killed himself. Police believe this is not a domestic violence incident and that the female victim was a supervisor killed by her subordinate.

This a developing story. Please check back for updates.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation(NASHVILLE, Tenn.) -- Elizabeth Thomas’ older sister, Kat Bozeman, said her family has experienced a "roller coaster" of emotions since her sister was returned home on Friday.

"It’s a roller coaster. Some days are good you see her more, some days are bad you see her less,” Bozeman told ABC News affiliate WKRN-TV on Sunday. "So it’s a long, long road ahead of us.”

She said her sister is being treated at a mental health facility where she spends a lot of time with a therapist. Visitations at the facility are limited, she said.

Bozeman said she and her sister hadn’t spoken much about her “traumatic” time on the run with her former teacher, Tad Cummins, 50, who allegedly kidnapped her more than a month ago.

“She told us she didn’t have access to telephone, internet, any electronic devices. There was not availability to food all the time, is the understanding,” Bozeman said.

"Obviously, we are really trying not to press her, because it’s really traumatic for her to remember all of these things."

Thomas and Cummins were found at a remote cabin in northern California near the Oregon border where he was captured Thursday, more than a month after the two disappeared in March.

The teen returned to Tennessee on Friday and is currently in a "safe location with family and friends where she is comfortable and resting," said Jason Whatley, who is representing the Thomas family.

After Thomas was found, authorities said she was "healthy and unharmed."

Thomas’ father, Anthony Thomas, told ABC News earlier that the experience has changed her.

“She may not be exactly ... the person she was because there’s a lot of experiences she’s had," he said.

Cummins is scheduled to make his first court appearance at 2 p.m. Monday in Sacramento, California.

He faces charges of aggravated kidnapping, sexual contact with a minor, and a federal charge of transportation of a minor across state lines with the intent of having criminal sexual intercourse, authorities said. That charge carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in prison.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Ryan Ciampoli(HARRISON, Ark.) -- Harrowing dash cam video captures the moment a 4-year-old girl fell out of the back of a moving church bus on a state highway in Arkansas.

The footage depicts the small child swinging out from the back door of a church bus on Highway 65 in Harrison, Arkansas, before falling off onto the street as the van briskly drives away.

"I saw it happening and it blew my mind, it's like I wasn't even seeing what I was seeing," Ryan Ciampoli, a volunteer firefighter who witnessed the girl's fall and called for help, told local ABC News affiliate KHBS-TV of Fort Smith, Arkansas.

"Obviously, you want to leave her laying there, you know, if she's not in danger, but we're in the middle of a state highway so I couldn't leave her just laying there," Ciampoli added.

Ciampoli said that at first the girl was unconscious, but eventually the "shock kicked in" and she started crying and calling for her mother.

The family of the young girl in the video declined ABC News' request for comment at this time, but told KHBS-TV that she broke her jaw in the fall and was hospitalized. She is expected to make a full recovery.

Tim Hampton, a pastor at the Christian Life Center Church, told ABC News that the church would not be using the bus again.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

NASA/Bill Ingalls(NEW YORK) — U.S. astronaut Peggy Whitson is smashing records left and right.

Whitson, 57, broke the record for the most cumulative time in space by an American astronaut early Monday, streaking past the 534-day record previously held by Jeff Williams. The 879-day global record, held by Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, still stands.

By the time Whitson returns to Earth in September, she will have spent 666 days in space. She hopes she won't hold the title for long.

At 1:27 a.m. ET on April 24, @AstroPeggy has officially broken @Astro_Jeff's record of 534 days in space. Wish her well with #CongratsPeggy! pic.twitter.com/ylZtOwt4lA

— Intl. Space Station (@Space_Station) April 24, 2017

"I'm not here because of the record," Whitson told ABC News' David Kerley via video teleconference from aboard the International Space Station earlier this month. "I'm definitely here for conducting the science."

Whitson said the research she's doing is "a really important stepping stone" to sending astronauts on even longer missions to Mars -- "the sooner the better."

"We still have some critical questions to answer," she told Kerley, including around the medical complications that come with living in zero gravity, like effects on bone density and muscle constriction, she told Kerley.

"I think the biggest hurdle probably for the human body is going to be the radiation ... and probably the easiest solution is to get there faster so that you take less risk along the way." she said.

Whitson, an Iowa native, is no stranger to shattering records. In 2008, she became the first woman to command the ISS, and just last month — during her eighth spacewalk — Whitson surpassed NASA's Sunita Williams for the woman with the most cumulative "extra-vehicular activity" time.

Her journey hasn't always been smooth sailing.

During re-entry following her second mission in 2008, her Soyuez capsule experienced a technical glitch, sending it hurtling into a violent dive and exposing the crew to forces eight times more powerful than the earth's gravity for more than a minute.

Nevertheless, her time in space is "one of those rides you hope never ends," Whitson tweeted Sunday. "I am so grateful for all those who helped me on each of my missions."

It is one of those rides that you hope never ends. I am so grateful for all those who helped me on each of my missions! #LifeInSpace pic.twitter.com/msjKSg6WWH

— Peggy Whitson (@AstroPeggy) April 23, 2017

President Trump and first daughter Ivanka Trump called into the ISS from the Oval Office to congratulate Whitson on her achievement Monday morning.

"This is a very special day in the glorious history of American space flight...That's an incredible record to break," President Trump said. "And on behalf of our nation, and frankly, on behalf of the world, I'd like to congratulate you. That is really something."

Whitson said it was an huge honor to break this record and to represent everyone at NASA "who make this space flight possible and who make me setting this record feasible."

She also said the International Space Station is providing "a key bridge from us living on earth to going somewhere in deep space," and it is crucial to the Mars mission.

President Trump asked about a timeline for sending Americans to Mars, to which Whitson responded, "It will approximately be in the 2030s."

Trump then said he hopes to make that happen in his first or second term, "So we'll have to speed that up a little bit, OK?" Trump said.

"We'll do our best," said Whitson, laughing.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(SOUTH PASADENA, Calif.) -- Police in California appealed to the public for help finding a 5-year-old boy who has been missing since Saturday and whose father has been arrested after police found him unconscious in a park.

Police said they found Aramazd Andressian Sr., 35, passed out near a car in Arroyo Park in South Pasadena, California, on Saturday and arrested him after an investigation about the whereabouts of his son, Aramazd Andressian Jr., ABC affiliate KABC-TV reported Sunday.

Police were still searching for the boy as of late Sunday and urged anyone with information to come forward.

Andressian was arrested on charges of child endangerment and child abduction, police said.

The child’s mother reported the boy missing on Saturday after Andressian, her estranged husband, failed to drop him off at a scheduled meeting place, authorities said. The couple is in the process of divorce and a custody battle, according to police.

The boy currently spends one week with each parent and speaks with the other through a video call twice a week, according to the boy's mother. She said she spoke with the boy via Skype on Tuesday, but a second call scheduled for Thursday never happened.

Police in South Pasadena said they searched the park for signs of the boy to no avail, the report said. It was still unclear how and why the father passed out.

Police described the father’s statements as "convoluted and not consistent" as well as "contradictory."

"When we found out the boy was missing we don't know if he crawled out of the car himself, if he walked away, if he was abducted -- we have no idea," South Pasadena Police Chief Art Miller said Saturday during a press conference. "To become unconscious when you're supposed to be in the care of a child, that's where our main concerns are."

A judge increased Andressian's bail to $10 million from $100,000 after detectives provided additional information about the circumstances of the case.

In a Facebook post late Sunday, the South Pasadena Police Department said it was still "pursuing leads" and had requested assistance from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation(MEMPHIS, Tenn.) -- The father of the Tennessee teen found more than a month after she was allegedly kidnapped by a former teacher said the girl's family wants her to be the same person she was before she disappeared.

But Anthony Thomas told ABC News that his 15-year-old daughter, Elizabeth, has now had experiences that may have changed her.

“What we want to see when we look at her is the child we knew,” Thomas told ABC News. “She may not be exactly ... the person she was because there’s a lot of experiences she’s had."

After Elizabeth was found, authorities described her as "healthy and unharmed," but added that the main concern is the state of her emotional and mental well-being.

Her father said that even physically, she has at least temporarily changed.

“She has lost a lot of weight,” Anthony Thomas said.

Elizabeth was allegedly kidnapped by her former teacher, Tad Cummins, 50, on March 13 and taken on the run. She and Cummins were found at a remote cabin in northern California near the Oregon border where he was captured Thursday.

Cummins, who surrendered to police without incident, faces charges of aggravated kidnapping and sexual contact with a minor, authorities said.

The teen returned to Tennessee on Friday and is currently in a "safe location with family and friends where she is comfortable and resting," said Jason Whatley, who is representing the Thomas family.

Elizabeth’s father told ABC News that the family to "just keep things positive" in their interactions with her at this stage.

"I go in there and tell her how much I missed her, how much I love her and how much her dog missed her," Anthony Thomas said.

"I'm not allowed to ask her about things that happened along the way right now," he said.

He said that one of the first things Elizabeth asked for "was to see her baby sister."

That hasn't happened yet, the father said. "Now is not really the time."

Thomas recounted his daughter's take-charge personality. "She used to really believe in herself. She had this confidence," he said. "She was always a leader. She was very outspoken."

"I think she has the determination to really go somewhere in life," he said. "But right now she really needs a lot of help."

Thomas said the first material things Elizabeth asked for upon returning to Tennessee were a shower and a razor.

He added that she has few clothes in her possession right now. "All of the clothes she had with her were taken for evidence" after she and Cummins were found, he said. And many of the clothes she had left at home were previously taken by law enforcement to help with the investigation, he said.

Thomas said the loss of her clothes may be difficult for his teen daughter. "She was always particular with the way she dressed."

Elizabeth also asked to see her father upon her return to Tennessee, he said. "It was really great to have her tell her she loved me," he said.

He said his daughter had told authorities that she was afraid her father would be mad at her. "I think Tad had told her too, 'There’s no way you can go home because your dad is just going to be mad at you,'" Thomas said.

The father said he believes Cummins was aware of the search for him and his daughter, but he's not sure if his daughter knew before she was found the extent of the effort to find them. "Tad was apparently aware of all the flyers and all the things he saw," the father said. "I’m not sure of the extent he let her be exposed to that."

Thomas reflected on the difficulty of parenting a teenager, and then having that child disappear.

"At the end of the day when they’re gone, you find out you can’t live without them," he said.

Cummins is expected to make his first court appearance at 2 p.m. Monday in federal court in Sacramento.

In addition to facing charges of aggravated kidnapping and sexual contact with a minor, he also faces a federal charge of transportation of a minor across state lines with the intent of having criminal sexual intercourse, which has been filed by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Middle District of Tennessee, authorities said. That charge carries a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in prison.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

FDNY(NEW YORK) -- Five people were killed, including three children, after a three-alarm fire blazed through a family home in the New York City borough of Queens on Sunday.

Fire officials said the entire house was consumed in flames by the time they showed up, just minutes after FDNY first received a phone call around 2:30 p.m. reporting the fire traveling from the first floor to the second floor.

The youngest child who died was 2 years old and the oldest victim was 21, according to New York City Fire Department Commissioner Daniel Nigro, but as of Sunday afternoon one victim's age was still unknown.

At least one person, a 46-year-old, survived by jumping out a second-story window, the fire commissioner said at a news conference Sunday afternoon.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said it was the city's biggest loss of life in a fire in two years.

"This happened in the middle of an afternoon when the weather was good," he said at the news conference. "How could something like this could have happened? There are many unanswered questions."

The fire commissioner said Sunday that fire marshals would investigate the cause of the fire.


ABC Breaking News | Latest News Videos

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

WLS-TV(WHEATON, Ill.) -- A 19-year-old college student was killed at a track meet in Wheaton, Illinois, on Saturday when he was struck by a hammer during the hammer throw event.

Wheaton College said in a statement that freshman Ethan Roser, a transfer student from Cincinnati, Ohio, was volunteering at the school's track and field competition when he was accidentally hit.

Paramedics were on the scene with Wheaton College Public Safey immediately, according to the college, but Roser was pronounced dead after he was transported to Good Samaritan Hospital in Downers Grove.

"We are deeply grieved, but, because of our faith in Christ, not without hope," Wheaton College President Philip Ryken said in a statement. "We ask people to pray for Ethan's family, his friends, and our campus community.”

Roser was a member of the soccer team, according to ABC station WLS-TV.

A service was scheduled to be held for students, faculty and staff of Wheaton College at Pierce Memorial Chapel on Sunday night.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Attorney General Jeff Sessions says people should lighten up about controversial comments he made earlier this week about the state of Hawaii.

When asked by ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos in an exclusive interview Sunday on This Week about why he referred to Hawaii as an "island in the Pacific," Sessions responded "nobody has a sense of humor anymore."

Sessions stirred up controversy this week when he referred to Hawaii as an "island in the Pacific" to conservative radio host Mark Levin on his program.

"I really am amazed that a judge sitting on an island in the Pacific can issue an order that stops the president from the United States what appears to be clearly his statutory and constitutional power," Sessions said on the program Tuesday.

Sessions' comments were referring to the Hawaii judge who issued a nationwide restraining order on President Trump's revised executive order that calls for suspending the entire refugee program for 120 days and halting immigration from six countries in the Middle East and Africa for 90 days.

Sessions’ comments prompted backlash from Hawaii’s Democratic senators and representatives in Congress.

“The suggestion that being from Hawaii somehow disqualifies Judge Watson from performing his Constitutional duty is dangerous, ignorant, and prejudiced," Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, said in a statement Thursday. "I am frankly dumbfounded that our nation’s top lawyer would attack our independent judiciary. But we shouldn’t be surprised. This is just the latest in the Trump Administration’s attacks against the very tenets of our Constitution and democracy.”

Hirono also tweeted, “Hey Jeff Sessions, this #IslandinthePacific has been the 50th state for going on 58 years. And we won’t succumb to your dog whistle politics.”

Hey Jeff Sessions, this #IslandinthePacific has been the 50th state for going on 58 years. And we won’t succumb to your dog whistle politics

— Senator Mazie Hirono (@maziehirono) April 20, 2017

When, Stephanopoulos pressed Sessions on This Week for a response to Hirono, asking “Why not just call it the state of Hawaii?” Sessions instead defended the administration's actions, saying that the executive order is "lawful" and he plans to continue the fight to reinstate it.

“The president -- nobody has a sense of humor anymore. Look. The president has to deal with the Department of Defense, the national intelligence agencies, CIA. He knows the threats to this country. He is responsible for protecting America,” the attorney general said. “This order is lawful. It's within his authority constitutionally and explicit statutory authority. We're going to defend that order all the way up. And so you do have a situation in which one judge out of 700 in America has stopped this order.

“I think it's a mistake. And we're going to battle in the courts and I think we'll eventually win,” Sessions added.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.


LinkedUpRadio Envisionwise Web Services